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How do I refer to the network column from the subselect in the having clause?

select distinct c.id, c.name,
(
select count(cm.id) cnt
from
company_mapping cm
where
cm.company_id_source = c.id
or
cm.company_id_target = c.id
) network
from company c
where
c.name like 'foobar%'
group by c.id, c.name
having network > 1

ORA-00904: "NETWORK": invalid identifier. If I leave out the last line, it works as expected but I'm only interested in rows having network > 1.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried changing network to something else, for example aaaaa –  Matteo Tassinari May 15 '13 at 8:32
    
"AAA": invalid identifier - gives the same error code. –  kosmičák May 15 '13 at 8:34
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, you can't have distinct and group by in the same query. It's only redundant, you are right, I don't know why oracle doesn't throw an exception.

Second, the alias is not known at the same level as the query. You should enclose this in outer query.

select id, name, network
from (
    select c.id, c.name,
      (
      select count(cm.id) cnt
      from
      company_mapping cm
      where
      cm.company_id_source = c.id
      or
      cm.company_id_target = c.id
      ) network
    from company c
    where
    c.name like 'foobar%'
    group by c.id, c.name
)
WHERE network > 1;
share|improve this answer
1  
You mean the distinct is redundant? Because Oracle doesn't complain about using both distinct and group by in my example. –  kosmičák May 15 '13 at 8:44
    
If c.id is the primary key on the company table then the group by is redundant -- if it is not then you'd do better to define an in-line view to return distinct c.id and c.name prior to applying the subquery in the select. Come to think of it, you might as well get rid of the subquery and just join from company to company_mapping, using a having clause to filter the aggregate result. –  David Aldridge May 15 '13 at 9:21
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You can't access field which is defined in select in group by, having or where.

The order of sql operators is as follows :

1.FROM clause
2.WHERE clause
3.GROUP BY clause
4.HAVING clause
5.SELECT clause
6.ORDER BY clause 

That's why you can use network in order by but not in operators which come before select.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice answer! (and if you put a link to docs would be even nicer :)) –  Florin Ghita May 15 '13 at 9:12
    
You can see the order of MSSQL here - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189499%28v=SQL.105%29.aspx. I believe that Oracle's logical order is the same. –  Grisha May 15 '13 at 10:05
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Ronnis is on the right path, but the query should actually be even simpler. Please try to avoid select inside select, because it is a performance killer 99% of the time.

select c.id
,      c.name
,      count(*) network
from   company c
join   company_mapping cm on c.id in (cm.company_id_source, cm.company_id_target)
where  c.name like 'foobar%'
group by c.id, c.name
having count(*) > 1
share|improve this answer
    
Something is weird here... I removed the having clause and run both my initial version and yours, replaced foobar with something meaningful and on our database your query takes between 30-40s, mine less than 2 seconds. Also your version doesn't return companies where network=0. –  kosmičák May 15 '13 at 10:28
    
Could the difference be that your version has to create a huge cartesian product first and only then pick those with name like 'foobar%' while in mine it first picks those foobar rows and only apply the subselect for them? –  kosmičák May 15 '13 at 10:37
1  
Yeah, exactly. I use join and not left join, because of the rule that count(*) had to be greater than 1. Use left join if you want network = 0 in the list too. I guess the reason for the bad performance is that Oracle doesn't use indexes with this IN join. Either add an index on company_id_source & company_id_target (together) or change the query to use an index. –  winkbrace May 15 '13 at 13:35
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Are you trying to do something like this?

select c.id
      ,c.name
      ,count(*) 
      ,count(s.company_id_source) as num_sources
      ,count(t.company_id_target) as num_targets
  from company              c
  left join company_mapping s on(s.company_id_source = c.id)
  left join company_mapping t on(t.company_id_target = c.id)
 where c.name like 'foobar%'  
 group 
    by c.id
      ,c.name
having count(s.company_id_source) > 1
    or count(t.company_id_target) > 1;

Edit: New query below in response to comments. The query is now returning: All companies matching "Foobar" regardless of whether they have an associated row in table company_mapping, along with:

  • num_sources: The nr of rows in company_mapping where the company is the source.
  • num_targets: The nr of rows in company_mapping where the company is the target.
  • num_mappings: The nr of "connections" in company_mapping (either source or target)

.

select c.id
      ,c.name
      ,count(s.company_id_source) + count(t.company_id_target)   as num_mappings
      ,count(s.company_id_source) as num_sources
      ,count(t.company_id_target) as num_targets
  from company              c
  left join company_mapping s on(s.company_id_source = c.id)
  left join company_mapping t on(t.company_id_target = c.id)
 where c.name like 'foobar%'  
 group 
    by c.id
      ,c.name;
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, that's what I was thinking, but I'd use a single company_mapping table and put both join conditions in that if possible. I think the left join could then be an inner join also. –  David Aldridge May 15 '13 at 9:23
    
Yes, I already tried having two left joins but I definitely need the count of both in a single column. –  kosmičák May 15 '13 at 10:32
    
@kosmičák, you get the count with COUNT(*). Since I'm outer joining to company_mapping twice, you can easily get the individal count for source/target as well. –  Ronnis May 15 '13 at 11:48
    
@DavidAldridge, Good point! I didn't think of combining them into one until I saw Bazz's solution. But I think I'm leaving it this way just to provide an alternative solution. The execution plans will be different between his solution and mine. –  Ronnis May 15 '13 at 11:52
    
@Ronnies still, companies without an associated row in company_mapping have count(*)=1 instead of 0, that's wrong –  kosmičák May 15 '13 at 11:54
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