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Say I want to serialize, then deserialize a decimal using protobuf-net:

const decimal originalDecimal = 1.6641007661819458m;
using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
{
    Serializer.Serialize(memoryStream, originalDecimal);
    memoryStream.Position = 0;
    var deserializedDecimal = Serializer.Deserialize<decimal>(memoryStream);
    Assert.AreEqual(originalDecimal, deserializedDecimal);
}

It works fine. Protobuf-net internally uses the following representation for decimals (cf. Bcl.proto):

message Decimal {
  optional uint64 lo = 1; // the first 64 bits of the underlying value
  optional uint32 hi = 2; // the last 32 bis of the underlying value
  optional sint32 signScale = 3; // the number of decimal digits, and the sign
}

Now say that I define a supposedly equivalent proto contract by code:

[ProtoContract]
public class MyDecimal
{
    [ProtoMember(1, IsRequired = false)]
    public ulong Lo;

    [ProtoMember(2, IsRequired = false)]
    public uint Hi;

    [ProtoMember(3, IsRequired = false)]
    public int SignScale;
}

...then I can't serialize a decimal and get a MyDecimal back, nor serialize a MyDecimal and get a decimal back.

From decimal to MyDecimal:

const decimal originalDecimal = 1.6641007661819458m;
using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
{
    Serializer.Serialize(memoryStream, originalDecimal);
    memoryStream.Position = 0;

    // following line throws a Invalid wire-type ProtoException
    Serializer.Deserialize<MyDecimal>(memoryStream);
}

From MyDecimal to decimal:

var myDecimal = new MyDecimal
{
    Lo = 0x003b1ee886632642,
    Hi = 0x00000000,
    SignScale = 0x00000020,
};

using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
{
    Serializer.Serialize(memoryStream, myDecimal);
    memoryStream.Position = 0;

    // following line throws a Invalid wire-type ProtoException
    Serializer.Deserialize<decimal>(memoryStream);
}

Am I missing something here?

I'm working on a C++ application which needs to communicate with a C# one through protocol buffers and can't figure why decimal deserializations fail.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is an edge case of the "is it an object? or a naked value?". You can't just serialize an int, say, in protobuf - you need a wrapper object. For naked values, therefore, it pretends that the value is actually field 1 of a hypothetical wrapper object. In the case of decimal, though, this is a bit tricky - since decimal is actually encoded as though it were an object. So technically decimal could be written as a naked value... but: it looks like it isn't (it is wrapping it) - and I doubt it would be a good idea to rectify that at this stage.

Basically, this will work a lot more reliably if instead of serializing a naked value, you serialize an object that has a value. It will also work more efficiently (protobuf-net looks for types it knows about, with the naked values very much a fallback scenario). For example:

[ProtoContract]
class DecimalWrapper {
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public decimal Value { get; set; }
}
[ProtoContract]
class MyDecimalWrapper {
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public MyDecimal Value { get; set; }
}

If we serialize these, they are 100% interchangeable:

const decimal originalDecimal = 1.6641007661819458m;
using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
{
    var obj = new DecimalWrapper { Value = originalDecimal };
    Serializer.Serialize(memoryStream, obj);
    // or, as it happens (see text) - this is equal to
    // Serializer.Serialize(memoryStream, originalDecimal);

    memoryStream.Position = 0;
    var obj2 = Serializer.Deserialize<MyDecimalWrapper>(memoryStream);
    Console.WriteLine("{0}, {1}, {2}",
        obj2.Value.Lo, obj2.Value.Hi, obj2.Value.SignScale);
    // ^^^ 16641007661819458, 0, 32

    memoryStream.SetLength(0);
    Serializer.Serialize(memoryStream, obj2);
    memoryStream.Position = 0;
    var obj3 = Serializer.Deserialize<DecimalWrapper>(memoryStream);

    bool eq = obj3.Value == obj.Value; // True
}

Actually, because protobuf-net pretends there is an object, it is also true to say that Serialize<decimal> would be 100% compatible with Serialize<MyDecimalWrapper>, but for your own sanity it is probably just easier to stick to a simple "always serialize a DTO instance" approach, rather than having to think "is this a DTO? or is it a naked value?"


As a final thought: if you are using interop, I would suggest avoiding decimal, since that is not defined in the protobuf specification, and different platforms often have a different meaning of their "decimal" type. protobuf-net invents a meaning, mainly to allow protobuf-net to round-trip (to itself) a wider range of DTOs, but it may be awkward to parse that value into an arbitrary platform. When working cross-platform and using decimal, I recommend considering things like double/float, or some fixed precision via long/ulong, or maybe even just string.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the answer. All this makes sense. Some comments: 1. We don't send naked decimals, we use them in DTO. 2. Yes, my sample doesn't quite illustrates the problem I was having; in fact, I figured out that the serialization/deserialization of a DecimalWrapper containing a decimal to/from a MyDecimalWrapper containing a MyDecimal worked as expected. 3. In my case, I have a decimal in C++ that can be expressed as a C# compatible lo/hi/signscale; the protobuf-net decimal looked like a good contract. – Romain Verdier May 15 '13 at 13:25
1  
4. The problem seems to be caused by the fact that bcl.proto decimal was defined with a sint32 SignScale, and that protobuf-net was writing/reading a uint32 to/from the stream. If the serialization occured in C++ (write of sint32), then the way protobuf-net reads it produces an invalid value. I'm not even sure how to handle sint32 values in C#. – Romain Verdier May 15 '13 at 13:32
    
@RomainVerdier ah, sint32 vs uint32... damn, that's a pain. The zig-zag encoding is easy enough, but if I've made the contract and code say different things then that is annoying – Marc Gravell May 15 '13 at 13:34
    
@RomainVerdier hmmm... probably the primary "fix" here is to change the bcl.proto to advertise uint32. Very curious. – Marc Gravell May 15 '13 at 13:36
    
@RomainVerdier ah, I think uint makes a lot of sense, actually; the way it works here is to encode the sign as bit 0, and the scale as bits 1-16 - so only the first 16 bits are used and it is always positive; sint32 would be inefficient – Marc Gravell May 15 '13 at 13:43

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