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I want to merge two dictionaries A and B such that the result contains:

  • All pairs from A where key is unique to A
  • All pairs from B where key is unique to B
  • f(valueA, valueB) where the same key exists in both A and B

For example:

def f(x, y):
    return x * y

A = {1:1, 2:3}
B = {7:3, 2:2}

C = merge(A, B)

Output:

{1:1, 7:3, 2:6}

It feels like there should be a nice one-liner to do this.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use dictionary views to achieve this; the dict.viewkeys() result acts like a set and let you do intersections and symmetrical differences:

def merge(A, B, f):
    # Start with symmetric difference; keys either in A or B, but not both
    merged = {k: A.get(k, B.get(k)) for k in A.viewkeys() ^ B.viewkeys()}
    # Update with `f()` applied to the intersection
    merged.update({k: f(A[k], B[k]) for k in A.viewkeys() & B.viewkeys()})
    return merged

In Python 3, the .viewkeys() method has been renamed to .keys(), replacing the old .keys() functionality (which in Python 2 returs a list).

The above merge() method is the generic solution which works for any given f().

Demo:

>>> def f(x, y):
...     return x * y
... 
>>> A = {1:1, 2:3}
>>> B = {7:3, 2:2}
>>> merge(A, B, f)
{1: 1, 2: 6, 7: 3}
>>> merge(A, B, lambda a, b: '{} merged with {}'.format(a, b))
{1: 1, 2: '3 merged with 2', 7: 3}
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Stealing this (A.get(k, B.get(k)) snippet from @MartijnPieters

>>> def f(x, y):
        return x * y

>>> A = {1:1, 2:3}
>>> B = {7:3, 2:2}
>>> {k: f(A[k], B[k]) if k in A and k in B else A.get(k, B.get(k))
     for k in A.viewkeys() | B.viewkeys()}
{1: 1, 2: 6, 7: 3}
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@MartijnPieters good point change to set union –  jamylak May 15 '13 at 9:24
>>> def f(x,y):
...     return x*y
... 
>>> dict([(k,v) for k,v in A.items()] + [ (k,v) if k not in A else (k,f(A[k],B[k])) for k,v in B.items()])
{1: 1, 2: 6, 7: 3}
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from itertools import chain

intersection = set(A.keys()).intersection(B.keys())
C = dict(chain(A.items(), B.items(), ((k, f(A[k], B[k])) for k in intersection)))

Could technically be made into a oneliner. Works in both Py2 and Py3. If you only care about Py3, you can rewrite the 'intersection' line to:

intersection = A.keys() & B.keys()

(for Py2-only, use A.viewkeys() & B.viewkeys() instead.)

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You are only processing keys that are either in A or B, not in both, and ignoring the intersecting keys and f(). –  Martijn Pieters May 15 '13 at 9:27
    
This also won't work for keys in A that are None, numeric 0 or empty sequences, which test as False. –  Martijn Pieters May 15 '13 at 9:27
    
Don't use != None, rather use not is None. This still will fail for keys whose value is None: A = {1: None}. –  Martijn Pieters May 15 '13 at 9:31
    
@MartijnPieters: I fixed that while you were commenting. (except for None) Looks like I totally misread the question though, so I'll try to fix that. –  kampu May 15 '13 at 9:31
    
The intersection calculation isn't as efficient as it could be (.viewkeys() returns a set-like object, using & on those will give you an intersection too with less work for the interpreter), but at least now you don't mess up None values anymore. :-) –  Martijn Pieters May 15 '13 at 10:05

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