Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to merge two dictionaries A and B such that the result contains:

  • All pairs from A where key is unique to A
  • All pairs from B where key is unique to B
  • f(valueA, valueB) where the same key exists in both A and B

For example:

def f(x, y):
    return x * y

A = {1:1, 2:3}
B = {7:3, 2:2}

C = merge(A, B)

Output:

{1:1, 7:3, 2:6}

It feels like there should be a nice one-liner to do this.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use dictionary views to achieve this; the dict.viewkeys() result acts like a set and let you do intersections and symmetrical differences:

def merge(A, B, f):
    # Start with symmetric difference; keys either in A or B, but not both
    merged = {k: A.get(k, B.get(k)) for k in A.viewkeys() ^ B.viewkeys()}
    # Update with `f()` applied to the intersection
    merged.update({k: f(A[k], B[k]) for k in A.viewkeys() & B.viewkeys()})
    return merged

In Python 3, the .viewkeys() method has been renamed to .keys(), replacing the old .keys() functionality (which in Python 2 returs a list).

The above merge() method is the generic solution which works for any given f().

Demo:

>>> def f(x, y):
...     return x * y
... 
>>> A = {1:1, 2:3}
>>> B = {7:3, 2:2}
>>> merge(A, B, f)
{1: 1, 2: 6, 7: 3}
>>> merge(A, B, lambda a, b: '{} merged with {}'.format(a, b))
{1: 1, 2: '3 merged with 2', 7: 3}
share|improve this answer

Stealing this (A.get(k, B.get(k)) snippet from @MartijnPieters

>>> def f(x, y):
        return x * y

>>> A = {1:1, 2:3}
>>> B = {7:3, 2:2}
>>> {k: f(A[k], B[k]) if k in A and k in B else A.get(k, B.get(k))
     for k in A.viewkeys() | B.viewkeys()}
{1: 1, 2: 6, 7: 3}
share|improve this answer
    
@MartijnPieters good point change to set union – jamylak May 15 '13 at 9:24

Here's my solution code in Python 3 for the general case.

I first wrote the merge function and then extend it to the more general merge_with function, which takes a function and various number of dictionaries. Were there any duplicate keys in those dictionaries, apply the supplied function to the values whose keys are duplicate.

The merge function can be redefined using the merge_with function, as in the case of merger function. The name merger means to merge them all and keep the rightmost values, were there any duplicates. So does the mergel function, which keep the leftmost.

All the functions here — merge, merge_with, mergel, and merger — are generic in the case that they take arbitrary number of dictionary arguments. Specifically, merge_with must take as argument a function compatible with the data to which it will apply.

from functools import reduce
from operator import or_

def merge(*dicts):
    return { k: reduce(lambda d, x: x.get(k, d), dicts, None)
             for k in reduce(or_, map(lambda x: x.keys(), dicts), set()) }

def merge_with(f, *dicts):
    return { k: (lambda x: f(*x) if len(x)>1 else x[0])([ d[k] for d in dicts
                                                          if k in d ])
             for k in reduce(or_, map(lambda x: x.keys(), dicts), set()) }

mergel = lambda *dicts: merge_with(lambda *x: x[0], *dicts)

merger = lambda *dicts: merge_with(lambda *x: x[-1], *dicts)

Tests

>>> squares = { k:k*k for k in range(4) }
>>> squares
{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 4, 3: 9}
>>> cubes = { k:k**3 for k in range(2,6) }
>>> cubes
{2: 8, 3: 27, 4: 64, 5: 125}
>>> merger(squares, cubes)
{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 8, 3: 27, 4: 64, 5: 125}
>>> merger(cubes, squares)
{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 4, 3: 9, 4: 64, 5: 125}
>>> mergel(squares, cubes)
{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 4, 3: 9, 4: 64, 5: 125}
>>> mergel(cubes, squares)
{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 8, 3: 27, 4: 64, 5: 125}
>>> merge(squares, cubes)
{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 8, 3: 27, 4: 64, 5: 125}
>>> merge(cubes, squares)
{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 4, 3: 9, 4: 64, 5: 125}
>>> merge_with(lambda x, y: x+y, squares, cubes)
{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 12, 3: 36, 4: 64, 5: 125}
>>> merge_with(lambda x, y: x*y, squares, cubes)
{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 32, 3: 243, 4: 64, 5: 125}

Update

After I wrote the above, I find there's another way to do it.

from functools import reduce

def merge(*dicts):
    return reduce(lambda d1, d2: reduce(lambda d, t:
                                        dict(list(d.items())+[t]),
                                        d2.items(), d1),
                  dicts, {})

def merge_with(f, *dicts):
    return reduce(lambda d1, d2: reduce(lambda d, t:
                                        dict(list(d.items()) +
                                             [(t[0], f(d[t[0]], t[1])
                                               if t[0] in d else
                                               t[1])]),
                                        d2.items(), d1),
                  dicts, {})

mergel = lambda *dicts: merge_with(lambda x, y: x, *dicts)
merger = lambda *dicts: merge_with(lambda x, y: y, *dicts)

Notice that the definitions for mergel and merger using merge_with have been changed with new functions as first arguments. The f function must now be binary. The tests provided above still works. Here are some more tests to show the generality of those functions.

>>> merge() == {}
True
>>> merge(squares) == squares
True
>>> merge(cubes) == cubes
True
>>> mergel() == {}
True
>>> mergel(squares) == squares
True
>>> mergel(cubes) == cubes
True
>>> merger() == {}
True
>>> merger(squares) == squares
True
>>> merger(cubes) == cubes
True
>>> merge_with(lambda x, y: x+y, squares, cubes, squares)
{0: 0, 1: 2, 2: 16, 3: 45, 4: 64, 5: 125}
>>> merge_with(lambda x, y: x*y, squares, cubes, squares)
{0: 0, 1: 1, 2: 128, 3: 2187, 4: 64, 5: 125}
share|improve this answer
>>> def f(x,y):
...     return x*y
... 
>>> dict([(k,v) for k,v in A.items()] + [ (k,v) if k not in A else (k,f(A[k],B[k])) for k,v in B.items()])
{1: 1, 2: 6, 7: 3}
share|improve this answer
from itertools import chain

intersection = set(A.keys()).intersection(B.keys())
C = dict(chain(A.items(), B.items(), ((k, f(A[k], B[k])) for k in intersection)))

Could technically be made into a oneliner. Works in both Py2 and Py3. If you only care about Py3, you can rewrite the 'intersection' line to:

intersection = A.keys() & B.keys()

(for Py2-only, use A.viewkeys() & B.viewkeys() instead.)

share|improve this answer
    
You are only processing keys that are either in A or B, not in both, and ignoring the intersecting keys and f(). – Martijn Pieters May 15 '13 at 9:27
    
This also won't work for keys in A that are None, numeric 0 or empty sequences, which test as False. – Martijn Pieters May 15 '13 at 9:27
    
Don't use != None, rather use not is None. This still will fail for keys whose value is None: A = {1: None}. – Martijn Pieters May 15 '13 at 9:31
    
@MartijnPieters: I fixed that while you were commenting. (except for None) Looks like I totally misread the question though, so I'll try to fix that. – kampu May 15 '13 at 9:31
    
The intersection calculation isn't as efficient as it could be (.viewkeys() returns a set-like object, using & on those will give you an intersection too with less work for the interpreter), but at least now you don't mess up None values anymore. :-) – Martijn Pieters May 15 '13 at 10:05
def merge_dict(dict1,dict2):
    dict1={1:'red'}
    dict2={2:'black',3:'yellow'}
    dict1.update(dict2)
    print 'dict3 =',dict1

merge_dict(dict1,dict2)

Output:

dict3 = {1: 'red', 2: 'black', 3: 'yellow'}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.