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I'm pretty new to PL/SQL, but I was wondering if there was a way to achieve the following :

   INSERT  INTO aTable (
   SELECT  FN_TO_VALUE(b.field1, b.field2, b.field3) as alias1,
           FN_TO_VALUE(b.field1, b.field2, b.field3) as alias2,
           FN_TO_VALUE(b.field1, b.field2, b.field3) as alias3,
           c.field1, c.field2
   FROM    bTable b, cTable c
   WHERE   b.alias1= c.field3
   );

Given that FN_TO_VALUE is a function that returns the corresponding datatype that would be in the aTable.

I get the following error statements :

PL/SQL : SQL Statement ignored (that's located at the INSERT INTO line)
PL/SQL : ORA-00904: "B"."ALIAS1" invalid identifier

ERRATA :

  • I had to modify the where clause from WHERE b.alias1= c.field1 to WHERE b.alias1= c.field3 because one of the solution provided by @Bob Jarvis wouldn't take into consideration other fields that might be required to link table bTable and cTable.

SOLUTION :

  • I have opted for the following solution :

     INSERT  INTO aTable (
       SELECT b.alias1,
              b.alias2,
              b.alias3,
              c.field1,
              c.field2
       FROM cTable c, 
       (
         SELECT FN_TO_VALUE (field1, field2, field3) AS alias1,
                FN_TO_VALUE (field1, field2, field3) AS alias2,
                FN_TO_VALUE (field1, field2, field3) AS alias3
         FROM bTable 
       ) b
       WHERE b.alias1 = c.field3
    );
    
share|improve this question
3  
you either have to use a sub-select ( making that alias a WHERE-clausable column) or WHERE FN_TO_VALUE(b.field1, b.field2, b.field3) = c.field1 instead of WHERE b.alias1= c.field1 –  Najzero May 15 '13 at 9:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
INSERT  INTO aTable (
SELECT inner.alias1,
       inner.alias2,
       inner.alias3,
       inner.field1,
       inner.field2
  FROM (SELECT FN_TO_VALUE (b.field1, b.field2, b.field3) AS alias1,
               FN_TO_VALUE (b.field1, b.field2, b.field3) AS alias2,
               FN_TO_VALUE (b.field1, b.field2, b.field3) AS alias3,
               c.field1,
               c.field2
          FROM bTable b, cTable c
         ) inner
 WHERE inner.alias1 = inner.field1
)

OR

INSERT  INTO aTable (
SELECT FN_TO_VALUE (b.field1, b.field2, b.field3) AS alias1,
       FN_TO_VALUE (b.field1, b.field2, b.field3) AS alias2,
       FN_TO_VALUE (b.field1, b.field2, b.field3) AS alias3,
       c.field1,
       c.field2
  FROM bTable b, cTable c
 WHERE FN_TO_VALUE (b.field1, b.field2, b.field3) = c.field1
   );
share|improve this answer
    
In the first example it looks to me like the WHERE clause should be removed from the inner SELECT, as b still doesn't have a field named alias1 (as far as I can see in this contrived example). The second looks like it should work, although the presence of a function call in the WHERE clause makes me nervous. –  Bob Jarvis May 15 '13 at 11:03
    
@BobJarvis: Yes ,thanks for correcting me for the first example ,and even i will also not suggest the second one ,calling the function twice for each row is not good practice. –  Gaurav Soni May 15 '13 at 11:27
    
About the first example, I haven't tested the code, but it seems to me that the join happens after the sub-select clause which is after the : inner WHERE inner.alias1 = iner.field1 is that logical? I mean... I've never used INNER in such a way, aside from INNER JOINs –  DFIVE May 15 '13 at 12:10
    
@dfive:inner is alias for the inline view ,if we use two inline view in this query and both having column column ,then to tell oracle which column from which view ,we need to give distinct name .Its just like table alias ,dnt be confused with KEYWORD INNER –  Gaurav Soni May 15 '13 at 12:29
    
@BobJarvis, I was just wondering about that INNER trick, what is it called and where can I find documentation about it? From what I see, inner is seen as a keyword... or are you just using inner as an alias? –  DFIVE May 15 '13 at 14:09

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