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I get some monthly stats in the below format, What I need to do is to get the smallest and largest for each column, I already use awk to get the table out of a much larger file using this script

awk 'c-->3;/By Day/{c=35; print}' file1.txt

and get the output:

By Day:

 Separate user logon counts-(max sessions)-(external counts)-(lock actions):
 2013/04/07 -      6    (   6)  (  37)  (   0)
 2013/04/08 -    190    (  70)  (6528)  (  30)
 2013/04/09 -    185    (  68)  (5986)  (  29)
 2013/04/10 -    213    (  85)  (5571)  (  36)
 2013/04/11 -    189    (  82)  (5410)  (  35)
 2013/04/12 -    165    (  69)  (5130)  (  25)
 2013/04/13 -     16    (  15)  ( 662)  (   0)
 2013/04/14 -     20    (  14)  (1016)  (   2)
 2013/04/15 -    160    (  64)  (6770)  (  39)
 2013/04/16 -    205    (  96)  (5978)  (  25)
 2013/04/17 -    197    (  83)  (5816)  (  37)
 2013/04/18 -    167    (  78)  (5554)  (  38)
 2013/04/19 -    152    (  71)  (5479)  (  29)
 2013/04/20 -     18    (  10)  ( 578)  (   1)
 2013/04/21 -     11    (   7)  (1018)  (   2)
 2013/04/22 -    193    (  74)  (6931)  (  30)
 2013/04/23 -    176    (  66)  (6184)  (  23)
 2013/04/24 -    192    (  74)  (5891)  (  26)
 2013/04/25 -    188    (  79)  (5575)  (  28)
 2013/04/26 -    170    (  75)  (5513)  (  26)
 2013/04/27 -     17    (  12)  ( 597)  (   0)
 2013/04/28 -     17    (  10)  (1021)  (   0)
 2013/04/29 -    193    (  79)  (6786)  (  38)
 2013/04/30 -    217    (  87)  (6094)  (  36)
 2013/05/01 -    185    (  82)  (5706)  (  32)
 2013/05/02 -    188    (  76)  (5602)  (  29)
 2013/05/03 -    167    (  63)  (5149)  (  21)
 2013/05/04 -     22    (  14)  ( 634)  (   1)
 2013/05/05 -     21    (  14)  ( 728)  (   1)
 2013/05/06 -      2    (   8)  (  46)  (   0)

Can I edit the awk script to sort by a set column and only display the sorted column and the first column?

share|improve this question

The correct way to print the line containing "By Day" and the subsequent 35 lines is:

awk '/By Day/{c=36} c&&c--' file1.txt

Now, post some representative input (and no, we do NOT need it to be 35 lines - make it 5 or less) and the expected output from that input and we can take a look at what you want to do next.

I see from a comment that you want to print the 3 lines before "By Day" too. That on it's own would be:

awk '
/By Day/{
    for (i=0;i<3;i++) {
        j=(NR+i)%3
        if (j in buf) {
            print buf[j]
        }
    }
}
{ buf[NR%3]=$0 }
' file

so you can combine those as:

awk -v pre=3 -v post=35 '
/By Day/{
    for (i=0;i<pre;i++) {
        j = (NR+i) % pre
        if (j in buf) {
            print buf[j]
        }
    }
    c = post + 1
}
{ buf[NR%pre]=$0 }
c&&c--
' file
share|improve this answer
    
If this is all the OP wanted to do I would suggest the simpler grep -A35 'By Day' file. – iiSeymour May 15 '13 at 12:57
1  
@sudo_O Right but it sounds like this is just the starting point and (s)he wants to do some additional processing and maybe they don't have access to GNU grep (I don't on some production machines at work and I can't install it there). – Ed Morton May 15 '13 at 13:11

I'm pretty sure your script is programming by coincidence. As it stands you decrement the variable c and test if it's greater than 3 on every line in the input. Depending the result the line will be print as the default block will be executed. The second block seems useless as it matches line containing By Day but your input contain a single match? As it stands c will be initialized as 0 as only decremented meaning the condition c-->3 is never true and therefor this script will print nothing with the current input!?

awk 'c-->3;/By Day/{c=35; print}' file1.txt

You should post the original file to get help on how to rewrite this script.


Ignoring your awk script and taking your current input I would remove the brackets and use sort. For example to do numerical sort on the fifth column:

$ sed 's/[()]//g' file | sort -nk5 | awk '{print $1,$5}'
Separate sessions-external
2013/04/07 37
2013/05/06 46
2013/04/20 578
2013/04/27 597
2013/05/04 634
2013/04/13 662
2013/05/05 728
2013/04/14 1016
2013/04/21 1018
2013/04/28 1021
2013/04/12 5130
2013/05/03 5149
2013/04/11 5410
2013/04/19 5479
2013/04/26 5513
2013/04/18 5554
2013/04/10 5571
2013/04/25 5575
2013/05/02 5602
2013/05/01 5706
2013/04/17 5816
2013/04/24 5891
2013/04/16 5978
2013/04/09 5986
2013/04/30 6094
2013/04/23 6184
2013/04/08 6528
2013/04/15 6770
2013/04/29 6786
2013/04/22 6931

Edit:

The simplest way to print 35 after the match a 3 lines before the match if you have GNU grep:

grep -A35 -B3 'By Day' file

Then pipe to sort using the numeric sort option -n and the specify the column with -k and use cut or awk to grab only the columns you want.

share|improve this answer
    
The awk script was to search for "By Day" and then display 35 lines below it and 3 lines above it – user2385338 May 15 '13 at 11:03
    
Well it doesn't, if that were the case the fourth line of your input would contain By Day. To do that you would want something like awk '/By Day/{n=NF}{a[NF]=$0}END{for(i=n-3;i<=n+35;i++}print a[i]}' of course you would need to describe the case of multiple matches, no matches, ect for a robust script. – iiSeymour May 15 '13 at 11:35
    
The script is almost correctly following the common awk idiom for printing ranges around a condition (in this case the N lines after an RE), but it should be c&&c-- instead of just c-- and I don't know what the >3 is doing there. The misleading part is that the OP posted only his output, not his input. – Ed Morton May 15 '13 at 12:27
    
@EdMorton there is no way to N print line before a condition without buffering/parsing twice!? The OP wants 3 lines about and 35 line after. – iiSeymour May 15 '13 at 12:34
    
Yes, I see he said that in a comment above, he didn't mention that in his question. I was just commenting on what the script does (or almost does) and how it relates to the question he posted. – Ed Morton May 15 '13 at 12:46

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