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What I'd like to be able to do...

I have a templated class which sets up a (named) shared memory pool based upon the type of object passed as the type parameter. I was wondering if, possibly through the aid of preprocessor operators or otherwise, there was a way to "stringize" the typename, and append an identifier?

Something along the lines of the syntax: <classtype>_identifier
Where MyClass<int> would generate int_identifier...
For example:

template<typename T>
class MyClass
{
private:
    #define TYPENAME_STRING(s) T_#s
    std::string m_typeName;

public:
    MyClass(std::string objName = "ObjectName")
    {
        // This:
        m_typeName = TYPENAME_STRING(objName.c_str());
        // ...Obviously doesn't work, since this is the equivalent of typing:
        m_typeName = "T_ObjectName";
        // ...When what we really want is something like:
        m_typeName = "int_ObjectName";
    }
    ~MyClass();        
};


Getting this to work would be useful to name, create and manage psuedo-unique memory pools based entirely upon the type of object being passed as the type parameter.

Is something like this possible?

Also, is it possible to resolve this typename and prepend it to an identifier WITHOUT being "stringized" (i.e., to create a typedef named intObjectName)?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, that is not possible, at least not at that level. Macros are evaluated before compilation, that is, before template type parameters like the T in your example are evaluated. What you could do however is something like this:

#include <string>
#include <memory>
template <class T> struct TInfo;
template <class T> class MyClass;

#define TINFO(type)                                \
template <> struct TInfo<type> {                   \
  static char const* getName() {                   \
    return #type;                                  \
  }                                                \
};                                                 \
typedef MyClass<type> type##_Class;                \
typedef std::unique_ptr<MyClass<type>> type##_UPtr; 


template <class T>
class MyClass {
private:
  std::string m_typeName;

public:
  MyClass(std::string objName = "ObjectName") 
    : m_typeName(std::string(TInfo<T>::getName()) + "_" + objName)
  {}

  std::string const& getName() {
    return m_typeName;
  }
};


//usage:
#include <iostream>

TINFO(int);
int main()
{
  int_UPtr pi(new int_Class());
  std::cout << pi->getName() << '\n';
}

See http://ideone.com/3ivyqv

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+1 for the reason why my example won't work, plus a working example. But is there also a way to generate typedefs which use the same naming convention? –  RectangleEquals May 15 '13 at 11:06
    
of course there is, I'll edit the example. –  Arne Mertz May 15 '13 at 11:30
    
Nice work, thanks! –  RectangleEquals May 15 '13 at 11:41
    
However, try to make the macro stuff as short and plain as possible. Debugging it is impossible, and compiler errors coming out of macroed code are hard to resolve. –  Arne Mertz May 15 '13 at 11:52

You can use this to have your types stringified :

template <typename T>
class MyClass {
public:
    static const char *name; // Not private
// ...
};

#define DECLARE_MY_CLASS(x) template<> const char *MyClass<x>::name = #x;

DECLARE_MY_CLASS(int);

But you need to DECLARE_MY_CLASS all your types you want to use.

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1  
Much simpler and easier to follow than above answer, upvoted –  PiotrK Feb 8 '14 at 19:55

I may be misreading this but you can get the string of a typename using typeid as follows:

template <typename T>
class MyClass 
{
private:
  const static std::string s_typeName;

public:

  const std::string getName() const 
  {
      return s_typeName;
  }
};

template<typename T>
const std::string MyClass<T>::s_typeName = std::string(typeid(T).name()) + "_identifier";
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