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A lot of Java PaaSes (such as CloudBees session stores) offer session clustering/storage such that it doesn't matter which server node a user gets routed to on a particular request, all server nodes share the same stored session data, and so any serve can server any client request.

I'm wondering how this applies to a client-side MVC, single page app like a GWT app.

With GWT, most of the app is executing client-side as JavaScript. Usually, the only time the client hits the server (via GWT-RPC or RequestFactory) is when the client needs data, in which case it makes a special call - under the hood - to the GWTServlet.

My understanding of shared session storing was that is applies to HttpServlet and the back-and-forth dialogue between client (request) and server (response). But that doesn't seem to really apply in GWT-land.

So I ask: could my GWT app benefit from the above-referenced application session store? Why or why not? If so, concrete examples are enormously appreciated! Thanks in advance!

Example:

I have an app that allows client-side users to perform certain actions:

public class BackOfficeServlet extends HttpServlet {
    @Override
    public void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) {
        User u = getUserFromRequest(request);
        Action a = getActionFromRequest(request);

        // If the user is allowed to do the action, then do it.
        if(UserActionAuthenticator.actionIsAllowed(u, a))
            a.execute(u, request);
    }
}

How/where would an HttpSession be used to add security or functionality not present in the code sample above?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using session clustering makes sense only if you use a session to stock some data. Ask you: do you need to save something in server side session? If the response is no, then there is no need to use session clustering too. GWT is all about statefull client side. Most of time you can eliminate the need for server side session by saving session data in browser directly. I give you an example where I wan't do it (and in this case session clustering will be useful):

Imagine that your app is a backoffice. Each user must be logged in and he can have different roles. Normally the list with roles will be present on client side (to be able show/hide some UI controls) and on the server side (linked to a session, to make the same checks twice on server side). You can't trust roles from client side because they may be modified by end user directly in browser (even if it's very very complex task in a case of minified JS). Here you have two options: 1) use server side session 2) emulate server side session (send some custom session token in each RPC call and then reload each time user roles). I prefer first option which give me ability to reuse existing security libraries like Spring Security (save me a lot of time / bugs). You may choose second option depending on your needs (your project has enough resources to implement and test your own implementations for server side session emulation and security aspects, making completely stateless server side).

To summarize:

  1. You have some sensitive session data -> store them in server session -> you need session clustering
  2. Your session data are not sensitive / you do not have them at all -> stock them in a browser / nothing to stock -> you do not need session and session clustering
  3. You have some sensitive session data -> store them somwhere on server side and reload them for each request using some custom session emulation technique -> you do not need session clustering (but you need more time to do it than option 1).

EDIT. In the code sample above you can have following potential problem:

  1. User is logged in as user1 (which have ROLE_USER permission).
  2. He generate somehow request with user2 inside (which have ROLE_ADMIN permission) and some action that can be executed only if you have ROLE_ADMIN permission.
  3. This action will be executed, even if user1 do not have corresponding permission.

The cause of the problem is that user object comes from untrusted source (request) and can be modified by end user. Instead of storing him on the client side we can store him on server side for example using server side session:

public class BackOfficeServlet extends HttpServlet {
    @Override
    public void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) {
        User u = getUserFromSession(request.getSession(false));
        Action a = getActionFromRequest(request);

        if(UserActionAuthenticator.actionIsAllowed(u, a))
            a.execute(u, request);
    }
}

Now we can trust the user object, because end user cann't change session objects.

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Thanks @Maksym Demidas (+1) - I'm starting to understand, but have one quick followup that I believe is the root of my confusion: in your example above, you say that your preferred option would be to use a server-side session to hold "roles list" for authenticating users and actions. But I don't understand why you wouldn't just declare a bean on the server-side called UserAuthenticator#authenticateUser(Action action, User user). That way, before you honored User U from performing Action A, you'd check with this bean method to see if its allowed. So why do we need server session? –  user1768830 May 15 '13 at 15:13
1  
Because in teory I can take chrome inspector, evaluate some JS code and replace my user object (which have USER role for example) by some another admin user object (which have ADMIN role). I can replace current action by something more interesting (delete all products action for example). Then I can call your server. In practice it will be hard but possible. It's up to you to take in account / ignore this risk. Is it more clear for you? –  Maksym Demidas May 15 '13 at 15:58
    
Thanks again (and +1) - I think we're getting somewhere: so you're saying that a user can (with difficulty) change client requests and thus gain admin-level capabilities. But I'm still not understanding how clustered sessions thwarts this. Can you explain how? Thanks again for all your help so far! –  user1768830 May 15 '13 at 16:22
1  
Because user can't modify sensitive data on server side directly. So you need server side session. If you want consistent behavior between two requests in cluster environment then you need clustered sessions. My answer is updated. –  Maksym Demidas May 15 '13 at 16:32
1  
Imagine that your clinet side JS fires two requests. Request 1 goes to node 1 where original session is (user is autheticated, so there is no problem). Request 2 goes to node 2. There is no session here if session clustering is turned off. User is not authenticated -> AccesDeniedException. Make sure that this case is possible in your environment. Because you can have "sticky session" features turned on (which means that each subsiquent request will be always routed to node 1). In this case session clustering neccessary only if you want be sure that if node 1 fails then user can continue work. –  Maksym Demidas May 15 '13 at 16:44

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