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There is only 1 admin view in my project. In this view administrator will work with many entities (each of that have personal DB context). Should I create a Big model which contents all my entities? Sounds stupid. Or should I somehow to connect many models to 1 view (never heard about this)?

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You can't pass more than one model into a view, you'll have to pass everything in one model. This is kind of the same idea as connecting many models to one view, you're just collecting the models in one model first.

For example, if you're trying to pass, say Person, Product and Item into one view, you'll just need to make an AdminViewModel that has those things as properties, and set them in the controller before you pass in the model.

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Seems, it`s the only way. But its so uncomely. – Stalli May 15 '13 at 12:56
2  
Maybe, but if you have one view that touches lots of entities, you could consider splitting it into a few smaller views. – Colm Prunty May 15 '13 at 12:57
    
Can I use PartialView? – Stalli May 15 '13 at 13:07
    
You could do something like: - In the main AdminViewModel pass the IDs of your entities. - In the admin view, do, for example Html.RenderPartial("ViewPerson", "Person", new { id = Model.PersonId }) - So then in the person controller, you can take that ID, build up the smaller model and render the partial view using it. This is really just a style choice, though, it's up to you what you want to do with it (and more importantly, how your entities and code are laid out). – Colm Prunty May 15 '13 at 13:11
    
I choose to split. – Stalli May 15 '13 at 13:21

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