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I have the following child classes CentreAddress and VenueAddress extending from a base abstract class BaseAddress.

I was thinking of implementing a simple Factory, AddressFactory to deal with creating concrete instances of CentreAddress and VenueAddress for my Centre and Venue classes.

My implementation though won’t allow me to assign values to the properties of the extended concrete instances at design time.

At runtime the correct concrete instance are being created.

I could change the return type of Centre.Address and Venue.Address - but surely this would be breaking the advantage of having AddressFactory the only part of the application that refers to concrete classes?

Is my implementation correct and/or does the pattern not lend itself very well here, ie. trying to stuff a pattern in when it's not needed? Code below.

Thank you

Sub Main()

    Dim centre1 = New Centre
    centre1.Name = "Centre 1"
    centre1.Address.Line1 = "Address Line 1"
    centre1.Address.Line2 = "Address Line 2"
    'centre1.Address.Line3 = "Address Line 3"  not allowed

    Dim venue1 = New Venue
    venue1.Name = "Venue 1"
    venue1.Address.Line1 = "Address Line 1"
    venue1.Address.Line2 = "Address Line 2"
    'venue1.Address.County.Name = "Bath and NE Somerset"  not allowed

End Sub

Public Class CentreAddress
    Inherits BaseAddress

    Public Property Line3 As String

End Class

Public Class VenueAddress
    Inherits BaseAddress

    Public Property County As County

End Class

Public Class County

    Public Property Name As String

End Class

Public Class Centre

    Private m_address As BaseAddress

    Public Property Name As String

    Public ReadOnly Property Address As BaseAddress
        Get
            If m_address Is Nothing Then
                m_address = AddressFactory.CreateAddress(Me)
            End If
            Return m_address
        End Get
    End Property

End Class

Public Class Venue

    Private m_address As BaseAddress

    Public Property Name As String

    Public ReadOnly Property Address As BaseAddress
        Get
            If m_address Is Nothing Then
                m_address = AddressFactory.CreateAddress(Me)
            End If
            Return m_address
        End Get
    End Property

End Class

Public Class AddressFactory

    Public Shared Function CreateAddress(objectType As Object) As BaseAddress

        If TypeOf objectType Is Venue Then
            Dim venueAddress As New VenueAddress With {.County = New County}
            Return venueAddress
        ElseIf TypeOf objectType Is Centre Then
            Return New CentreAddress
        Else
            Return New VenueAddress
        End If

    End Function

End Class
share|improve this question
    
What error are you getting when you attempt to set centre1.Address.Line3 ? –  Thomas Farley May 15 '13 at 13:03
3  
I guess he gets a message telling him that the Type BaseAddress has no property called Line3. –  Peter Stock May 15 '13 at 13:19

2 Answers 2

There's nothing wrong with having a single factory with two different methods which each return the specific derived type. For instance:

Public Class AddressFactory
    Public Shared Function CreateCentreAddress() As CentreAddress
        Return New CentreAddress()
    End Function

    Public Shared Function CreateVenueAddress() As VenueAddress
        Return New VenueAddress()
    End Function
End Class

Often, that's precisely the type of factory you want and need. You still have the advantage that common code can be written to work with base addresses, when the derived-specific properties are not applicable. For instance:

Public Sub DoSomethingWithVenue()
    Dim venueAddress As VenueAddress = factory.CreateVenueAddress()
    venueAddress.County = New County()
    ' ...
    DoSomethingWithAnyAddress(venueAddress)
End Sub

Public Sub DoSomethingWithCentre()
    Dim centreAddress As CentreAddress = factory.CreateCentreAddress()
    centreAddress.Line3 = "my line 3"
    ' ...
    DoSomethingWithAnyAddress(centreAddress)
End Sub

Public Sub DoSomethingWithAnyAddress(address As BaseAddress)
    address.Name = "my name"
    ' ...
End Sub

Sometimes, however, you do need the factory to return the objects as the base type, but that's only when you have common code that needs to create an object, but doesn't care which specific derived type is being created. It does not appear that that is the case here, so I wouldn't paint yourself into a corner unnecessarily. If you ever did need to do something like that in the future, you could still do so by creating new factory classes which reuse the original one:

Public Interface IAddressFactory
    Public Function CreateAddress() As BaseAddress
End Interface

Public Class VenueAddressFactory
    Implements IAddressFactory

    Private _factory As New AddressFactory()

    Public Function CreateAddress() As BaseAddress
        Return _factory.CreateVenueAddress()
    End Function
End Class

Public Class CentreAddressFactory
    Implements IAddressFactory

    Private _factory As New AddressFactory()

    Public Function CreateAddress() As BaseAddress
        Return _factory.CreateCentreAddress()
    End Function
End Class

Public Class CommonAddressBusiness
    Public Sub New(factory As IAddressFactory)
        _factory = factory
    End Sub

    Private _factory As IAddressFactory

    Public Sub DoSomething()
        Dim someTypeOfAddress As BaseAddress = _factory.CreateAddress()
        ' ...
    End Sub
End Class
share|improve this answer

Why don't you derive both Centre and Venue from a common base class with a Protected MustOverride Function CreateAddress()? You would only have to override this function in the respective derived class. You could even change the type of the Address property by overriding it using the new keyword. In my opinion, there is no need for a factory pattern. Beyond that, I don't see anything wrong with it.

share|improve this answer
1  
The question is very specific about wanting to use a factory pattern and the specifics of it, saying there's no need for it isn't really an answer, in my opinion. –  Rob Forrest May 15 '13 at 13:33
1  
@RobForrest: You are right, I'll provide a better answer next time. For now, it's all explained by Steven Doggart, I think. –  Peter Stock May 17 '13 at 6:27

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