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One of my clients has a domain name with email setup and working. They do not have a website yet. Their DNS config has

  • an A record with host webmail.company.com that points to their IP address
  • an MX record with host ex.company.com that points to the same IP address

As far as I can tell, they do not have an A record for the host @.

Their website will be hosted on external cloud-based CMS platform at company.cloudcms.com. Clearly a CNAME record needs to be added that points www to company.cloudcms.com.

Does an A record for the host @ also need to be added? If so, can/should it point to the same IP address that the email services point to?

Thanks in advance!

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1 Answer 1

If I have understood correctly you can do the following, supposing that your company domain is company.com and that the IP of company.cloudcms.com is 100.200.300.400:

Name     Type   Value
@        A          100.200.300.400 
webmail  CNAME  webmail.company.com.    
www      CNAME  company.cloudcms.com.   
@        MX         ex.company.com.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. What you have suggested looks more conventional than what the client currently has configured. –  user2386099 May 17 '13 at 13:46
    
What is ex in the MX record for? –  Dimitris Zorbas Aug 21 '13 at 22:58
    
A mail exchanger record (MX) specifies how email should be routed with the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol. Each MX record points to an email server that’s configured to process mail for a specific domain. There’s typically one record that points to a primary server. For more about MX records, watch the video Understanding and Working with MX Records –  r4m Aug 27 '13 at 12:31

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