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I am new to Scala. How do I implement methods in classes?

I have defined a trait which look like this:

trait Node extends Component{
  val label:Int
  val inputEdges:List[Edge] = List[Edge]()
  val outputEdges:List[Edge] = List[Edge]()

  def addInputEdge(edge:Edge) = {
    inputEdges :+ edge
    this
  }

  def addOutputEdge(edge:Edge) = {
    outputEdges :+ edge
    this
  }
}

case class SomeNode(label:Int) extends Node

I need help to understand how to implement the two methods.

Every class that extends Node must provide a label in the constructor but should inherit the two methods and the two lists. Also the methods should return a new object of the node with the edge added to one of the lists. Right now, if I call one of the methods I get the same object with no edge added to one of the list. It makes sense but I do not know how to add an edge when the two lists are immutable.

I really do not want to pass the lists in the constructor as then I will get constructors with many parameters.

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3 Answers 3

I know you asked for a solution where the lists do not appear in the constructor, but if you use default parameters it hopefully is acceptable. (I am interested why you want to avoid "fat" constructors, default parameters or companion objects apply method can help here.)
(By the way: use def in traits for abstract things and Seq instead of List)

Here is my approach:

trait Self[S] { self: S =>
  type SELF = S
}

trait Component
trait Edge

trait Node extends Component {
  type SELF
  protected def constructor: (Int, Seq[Edge], Seq[Edge]) => SELF
  def label: Int
  def inputEdges: Seq[Edge]
  def outputEdges: Seq[Edge]
  private def clone(inputEdges: Seq[Edge] = this.inputEdges, outputEdges: Seq[Edge] = this.outputEdges) = constructor(label, inputEdges, outputEdges)
  final def addInputEdge(edge: Edge) = clone(inputEdges = inputEdges :+ edge)
  final def addOutputEdge(edge: Edge) = clone(outputEdges = outputEdges :+ edge)
}

case class SomeNode(label: Int, inputEdges: Seq[Edge] = Seq(), outputEdges: Seq[Edge] = Seq()) extends Node with Self[SomeNode] {
  def constructor = SomeNode
}

val node1 = SomeNode(1)
val node2: SomeNode = node1.addInputEdge(new Edge {})
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Thanks, however this seems more confusing than having a big constructor (atlest for me). I do not like a big constructors as they make it hard to understand what a class really is in my opinion. I am just looking for an easy and elegant solution for a method that in OOP languages would be mutable. –  Mads Andersen May 15 '13 at 14:27

There are a few ways to acomplish what you are asking. First you could simply define the inputEdges and outputEdges as vars instead of vals. That way you can reasign the lists you create in the addInputEdge and addOutputEdge methods to the corresponding field.

trait Node extends Component {
  val label:Int
  var inputEdges:List[Edge] = List[Edge]()
  var outputEdges:List[Edge] = List[Edge]()

  def addInputEdge(edge:Edge) = {
    inputEdges = inputEdges :+ edge
    this
  }

  def addOutputEdge(edge:Edge) = {
    outputEdges = outputEdges :+ edge
    this
  }
}

This however introduces a mutable state which might not be desireable. A similar alternative approach would be to use a mutable list such as MutableList. Yet another aproach would be to make the add metdos abstract and have the subclasses responsible for creating new instances of themselves with the addition of the given edge.

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You could just use mutable variables. Not nice... Reconsider to use case classes with long constructors.

Here you go:

trait Node extends Component{
  var label:Int
  var inputEdges:List[Edge] = List[Edge]()
  var outputEdges:List[Edge] = List[Edge]()

  def addInputEdge(edge:Edge) = {
    inputEdges :+= edge
    this
  }

  def addOutputEdge(edge:Edge) = {
    outputEdges:+=  edge
    this
  }
}

case class SomeNode(label:Int) extends Node
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