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How can one call a stored procedure for each row in a table, where the columns of a row are input parameters to the sp without using a Cursor?

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3  
So, for example, you have a Customer table with a customerId column, and you want to call the SP once for each row in the table, passing in the corresponding customerId as a parameter? –  Gary McGill Nov 1 '09 at 10:21
    
Could you elaborate on why you can't use a cursor? –  Andomar Nov 1 '09 at 10:56
    
@Gary: Maybe I just want to pass the Customer Name, not necessarily the ID. But you are right. –  Johannes Rudolph Nov 1 '09 at 11:39
2  
@Andomar: Purely scientific :-) –  Johannes Rudolph Nov 1 '09 at 11:40
    
This issue bugs me greatly too. –  Daniel Jul 15 '10 at 19:09

13 Answers 13

up vote 83 down vote accepted

Generally speaking I always look for a set based approach (sometimes at the expense of changing the schema).

However, this snippet does have its place..

-- Declare & init (2008 syntax)
DECLARE @CustomerID INT = 0

-- Iterate over all customers
WHILE (1 = 1) 
BEGIN  

  -- Get next customerId
  SELECT TOP 1 @CustomerID = CustomerID
  FROM Sales.Customer
  WHERE CustomerID > @CustomerId 
  ORDER BY CustomerID

  -- Exit loop if no more customers
  IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0 BREAK;

  -- call your sproc
  EXEC dbo.YOURSPROC @CustomerId

END
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4  
I've seen other cursorless loops... yours is beautifully cleaner though! Thanks! –  eidylon Dec 1 '11 at 16:26
    
I really like this, thanks –  adudley Mar 16 '12 at 15:14
5  
as with the accepted answer USE WITH CATION: Depending on your table and index structure it can be very poorly performing ( O(n^2) ) since you have to order and search your table every time you enumerate. –  csauve May 30 '12 at 1:00
1  
This doesn't seem to work (break never exits loop for me - the work is done but the query spins in the loop). Initializing the id and checking for null in the while condition exits the loop. –  dudeNumber4 Jan 4 '13 at 23:21
2  
@@ROWCOUNT can only be read once. Even IF/PRINT statements will set it to 0. The test for @@ROWCOUNT must be done 'immediately' after the select. I would recheck your code/environment. technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187316.aspx –  Mark Powell Jan 14 at 13:44

You could do something like this: order your table by e.g. CustomerID (using the AdventureWorks Sales.Customer sample table), and iterate over those customers using a WHILE loop:

-- define the last customer ID handled
DECLARE @LastCustomerID INT
SET @LastCustomerID = 0

-- define the customer ID to be handled now
DECLARE @CustomerIDToHandle INT

-- select the next customer to handle    
SELECT TOP 1 @CustomerIDToHandle = CustomerID
FROM Sales.Customer
WHERE CustomerID > @LastCustomerID
ORDER BY CustomerID

-- as long as we have customers......    
WHILE @CustomerIDToHandle IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    -- call your sproc

    -- set the last customer handled to the one we just handled
    SET @LastCustomerID = @CustomerIDToHandle
    SET @CustomerIDToHandle = NULL

    -- select the next customer to handle    
    SELECT TOP 1 @CustomerIDToHandle = CustomerID
    FROM Sales.Customer
    WHERE CustomerID > @LastCustomerID
    ORDER BY CustomerID
END

That should work with any table as long as you can define some kind of an ORDER BY on some column.

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1  
+1 Nice workaround –  Andomar Nov 1 '09 at 10:55
11  
a while loop is not much different to a cursor of course... –  Mitch Wheat Nov 1 '09 at 11:40
4  
Is a set based implementation even possible? –  Johannes Rudolph Nov 1 '09 at 13:26
2  
@marc_s execute a function/storeprocedure for each item in a collection, that sounds like the bread and butter of set based operations. Problem arrises probably from not having results from each of them. See "map" in most functional programming languages. –  Daniel Jul 15 '10 at 19:09
2  
re:Daniel. A function yes, a stored procedure no. A stored procedure by definition can have side effects, and side effects are not allowed in queries. Similarly, a proper "map" in a functional language prohibits side effects. –  csauve May 30 '12 at 0:56
DECLARE @SQL varchar(max)=''

-- MyTable has fields fld1 & fld2

Select @SQL = @SQL + 'exec myproc ' + convert(varchar(10),fld1) + ',' + convert(varchar(10),fld2) + ';'
From MyTable

EXEC (@SQL)

Ok, so I would never put such code into production, but it does satisfy your requirements.

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If you can turn the stored procedure into a function that returns a table, then you can use cross-apply.

For example, say you have a table of customers, and you want to compute the sum of their orders, you would create a function that took a CustomerID and returned the sum.

And you could do this:

SELECT CustomerID, CustomerSum.Total

FROM Customers
CROSS APPLY ufn_ComputeCustomerTotal(Customers.CustomerID) AS CustomerSum

Where the function would look like:

CREATE FUNCTION ComputeCustomerTotal
(
    @CustomerID INT
)
RETURNS TABLE
AS
RETURN
(
    SELECT SUM(CustomerOrder.Amount) AS Total FROM CustomerOrder WHERE CustomerID = @CustomerID
)

Obviously, the example above could be done without a user defined function in a single query.

The drawback is that functions are very limited - many of the features of a stored procedure are not available in a user-defined function, and converting a stored procedure to a function does not always work.

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Marc's answer is good (I'd comment on it if I could work out how to!)
Just thought I'd point out that it may be better to change the loop so the SELECT only exists once (in a real case where I needed to do this, the SELECT was quite complex, and writing it twice was a risky maintenance issue).

-- define the last customer ID handled
DECLARE @LastCustomerID INT
SET @LastCustomerID = 0
-- define the customer ID to be handled now
DECLARE @CustomerIDToHandle INT
SET @CustomerIDToHandle = 1

-- as long as we have customers......    
WHILE @LastCustomerID <> @CustomerIDToHandle
BEGIN  
  SET @LastCustomerId = @CustomerIDToHandle
  -- select the next customer to handle    
  SELECT TOP 1 @CustomerIDToHandle = CustomerID
  FROM Sales.Customer
  WHERE CustomerID > @LastCustomerId 
  ORDER BY CustomerID

  IF @CustomerIDToHandle <> @LastCustomerID
  BEGIN
      -- call your sproc
  END

END
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The APPLY can be used only with functions... so this approach is by far better if you don't want to have to do with functions. –  Artur Feb 13 at 17:18

For SQL Server 2005 onwards, you can do this with CROSS APPLY and a table-valued function.

Just for clarity, I'm referring to those cases where the stored procedure can be converted into a table valued function.

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4  
Nice idea, but a function can't call a stored procedure –  Andomar Nov 1 '09 at 10:53

This is a variation of n3rds solution above. No sorting by using ORDER BY is needed, as MIN() is used.

Remember that CustomerID (or whatever other numerical column you use for progress) must have a unique constraint. Furthermore, to make it as fast as possible CustomerID must be indexed on.

-- Declare & init
DECLARE @CustomerID INT = (SELECT MIN(CustomerID) FROM Sales.Customer); -- First ID
DECLARE @Data1 VARCHAR(200);
DECLARE @Data2 VARCHAR(200);

-- Iterate over all customers
WHILE @CustomerID IS NOT NULL
BEGIN  

  -- Get data based on ID
  SELECT @Data1 = Data1, @Data2 = Data2
    FROM Sales.Customer
    WHERE [ID] = @CustomerID ;

  -- call your sproc
  EXEC dbo.YOURSPROC @Data1, @Data2

  -- Get next customerId
  SELECT @CustomerID = MIN(CustomerID)
    FROM Sales.Customer
    WHERE CustomerID > @CustomerId 

END

I use this approach on some varchars I need to look over, by putting them in a temporary table first, to give them an ID.

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If you don't what to use a cursor I think you'll have to do it externally (get the table, and then run for each statement and each time call the sp) it Is the same as using a cursor, but only outside SQL. Why won't you use a cursor ?

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I usually do it this way when it's a quite a few rows:

  1. Select all sproc parameters in a dataset with SQL Management Studio
  2. Right-click -> Copy
  3. Paste in to excel
  4. Create single-row sql statements with a formula like '="EXEC schema.mysproc @param=" & A2' in a new excel column. (Where A2 is your excel column containing the parameter)
  5. Copy the list of excel statements into a new query in SQL Management Studio and execute.
  6. Done.

(On larger datasets i'd use one of the solutions mentioned above though).

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1  
Not very useful in programming situations, that's a one-off-hack. –  Warren P Dec 18 '12 at 19:10

DELIMITER //

CREATE PROCEDURE setFakeUsers (OUT output VARCHAR(100))
BEGIN

    -- define the last customer ID handled
    DECLARE LastGameID INT;
    DECLARE CurrentGameID INT;
    DECLARE userID INT;

    SET @LastGameID = 0; 

    -- define the customer ID to be handled now

    SET @userID = 0;

    -- select the next game to handle    
    SELECT @CurrentGameID = id
    FROM online_games
    WHERE id > LastGameID
    ORDER BY id LIMIT 0,1;

    -- as long as we have customers......    
    WHILE (@CurrentGameID IS NOT NULL) 
    DO
        -- call your sproc

        -- set the last customer handled to the one we just handled
        SET @LastGameID = @CurrentGameID;
        SET @CurrentGameID = NULL;

        -- select the random bot
        SELECT @userID = userID
        FROM users
        WHERE FIND_IN_SET('bot',baseInfo)
        ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 0,1;

        -- update the game
        UPDATE online_games SET userID = @userID WHERE id = @CurrentGameID;

        -- select the next game to handle    
        SELECT @CurrentGameID = id
         FROM online_games
         WHERE id > LastGameID
         ORDER BY id LIMIT 0,1;
    END WHILE;
    SET output = "done";
END;//

CALL setFakeUsers(@status);
SELECT @status;
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I like to do something similar to this (though it is still very similar to using a cursor)

[code]

-- Table variable to hold list of things that need looping
DECLARE @holdStuff TABLE ( 
    id INT IDENTITY(1,1) , 
    isIterated BIT DEFAULT 0 , 
    someInt INT ,
    someBool BIT ,
    otherStuff VARCHAR(200)
)

-- Populate your @holdStuff with... stuff
INSERT INTO @holdStuff ( 
    someInt ,
    someBool ,
    otherStuff
)
SELECT  
    1 , -- someInt - int
    1 , -- someBool - bit
    'I like turtles'  -- otherStuff - varchar(200)
UNION ALL
SELECT  
    42 , -- someInt - int
    0 , -- someBool - bit
    'something profound'  -- otherStuff - varchar(200)

-- Loop tracking variables
DECLARE @tableCount INT
SET     @tableCount = (SELECT COUNT(1) FROM [@holdStuff])

DECLARE @loopCount INT
SET     @loopCount = 1

-- While loop variables
DECLARE @id INT
DECLARE @someInt INT
DECLARE @someBool BIT
DECLARE @otherStuff VARCHAR(200)

-- Loop through item in @holdStuff
WHILE (@loopCount <= @tableCount)
    BEGIN

        -- Increment the loopCount variable
        SET @loopCount = @loopCount + 1

        -- Grab the top unprocessed record
        SELECT  TOP 1 
            @id = id ,
            @someInt = someInt ,
            @someBool = someBool ,
            @otherStuff = otherStuff
        FROM    @holdStuff
        WHERE   isIterated = 0

        -- Update the grabbed record to be iterated
        UPDATE  @holdAccounts
        SET     isIterated = 1
        WHERE   id = @id

        -- Execute your stored procedure
        EXEC someRandomSp @someInt, @someBool, @otherStuff

    END

[/code]

Note that you don't need the identity or the isIterated column on your temp/variable table, i just prefer to do it this way so i don't have to delete the top record from the collection as i iterate through the loop.

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We can use cursor to do this

DECLARE cur cursor for

SELECT OrderId FROM [Order] //select values from table

DECLARE @OrderId INT

open cur

fetch next from cur into @OrderId

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0

BEGIN    

EXEC  your_sp_name your_parametures
fetch next from cur into @OrderId

END
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I'd use the accepted answer, but another possibility is to use a table variable to hold a numbered set of values (in this case just the ID field of a table) and loop through those by Row Number with a JOIN to the table to retrieve whatever you need for the action within the loop.

DECLARE @RowCnt int; SET @RowCnt = 0 -- Loop Counter

-- Use a table variable to hold numbered rows containg MyTable's ID values
DECLARE @tblLoop TABLE (RowNum int IDENTITY (1, 1) Primary key NOT NULL,
     ID INT )
INSERT INTO @tblLoop (ID)  SELECT ID FROM MyTable

  -- Vars to use within the loop
  DECLARE @Code NVarChar(10); DECLARE @Name NVarChar(100);

WHILE @RowCnt < (SELECT COUNT(RowNum) FROM @tblLoop)
BEGIN
    SET @RowCnt = @RowCnt + 1
    -- Do what you want here with the data stored in tblLoop for the given RowNum
    SELECT @Code=Code, @Name=LongName
      FROM MyTable INNER JOIN @tblLoop tL on MyTable.ID=tL.ID
      WHERE tl.RowNum=@RowCnt
    PRINT Convert(NVarChar(10),@RowCnt) +' '+ @Code +' '+ @Name
END
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