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How would I make a loop that does the loop until one of multiple conditions is met. For example:

do
{
    srand (time(0));
    estrength = rand()%100);

    srand (time(0));
    strength = rand()%100);
} while( ) //either strength or estrength is not equal to 100

Kind of a lame example, but I think you all will understand.

I know of &&, but I want it to only meet one of the conditions and move on, not both.

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just break from your loop when your condition is met, otherwise keep looping. –  DashControl May 15 '13 at 14:45
5  
Don't call srand multiple times. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar May 15 '13 at 14:46
    
@DanielKamilKozar Thanks for the tip ^.^ –  ConMaki May 15 '13 at 14:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use the || and/or the && operators to combine your conditions.

Examples:

1.

do
{
   ...
} while (a || b);

will loop while either a or b are true.

2.

do
{
...
} while (a && b);

will loops while both a and b are true.

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Would it be the same format of say, an if statement? –  ConMaki May 15 '13 at 14:46
1  
Anything that can be resolved to a bool is acceptable, just like an if statement. Yes. –  ChrisCM May 15 '13 at 14:48
    
@ConMaki Yes - a boolean expression. Just remember that in this case, if the expression is true (in the same way that you would enter the "if"), the loop will keep looping. So when you design your conditions, always think about the condition to keep on looping. –  Daniel Daranas May 15 '13 at 14:48
    
@Daniel I'll give it a shot, thanks. –  ConMaki May 15 '13 at 14:48
1  
@DanielDaranas Thank you for your help, it's working beautifully. –  ConMaki May 15 '13 at 15:02
while ( !a && !b ) // while a is false and b is false
{
    // Do something that will eventually make a or b true.
}

Or equivalently

while ( !( a || b ) ) // while at least one of them is false

This table of operator precedence will be useful when creating more complicated logical statements, but I generally recommend bracketing the hell out of it to make your intentions clear.

If you're feeling theoretical, you might enjoy De Morgan's Laws.

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2  
"Do something that will eventually make a or b true." ... or DON'T! har har har –  Daniel Kamil Kozar May 15 '13 at 14:46
    
@DanielKamilKozar Well an infinite loop is undefined behaviour, but whatever floats your boat... –  BoBTFish May 15 '13 at 14:49
    
That comment was just for fun. :) –  Daniel Kamil Kozar May 15 '13 at 14:49
    
Some people like to live dangerously! –  BoBTFish May 15 '13 at 14:51
do {

    srand (time(0));
    estrength = rand()%100);

    srand (time(0));
    strength = rand()%100);

} while(!estrength == 100 && !strength == 100 )
share|improve this answer
do {
  // ...
} while (strength != 100 || estrength != 100)
share|improve this answer

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