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I have this simple array which I want to order from the lower to the higher number:

"80", "84", "115", "98", "128", "131", "132", "128", "139", "140", "141", "142", "142", "124", "144", "145", "148", "149", "152", "97"

To sort it, I use sort, but the output is not the one I'd expect.

This is my code:

def try_order
  unordered = ["80", "84", "115", "98", "128", "131", 
               "132", "128", "139", "140", "141", "142", 
               "142", "124", "144", "145", "148", "149", "152", "97"]
  p "Unordered list is #{unordered}."

  ordered = unordered.sort

  p "Ordered list is #{ordered}."
end

try_order

And the output is as follows:

"Unordered list is 80841159812813113212813914014114214212414414514814915297."
"Ordered list is 11512412812813113213914014114214214414514814915280849798."

As you can see, the ordered list is not starting with the lower number, which is 80, but putting the 3-digit numbers which start with a 1 first.

Is there something I'm missing?

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6  
You're missing that a string is not a number. –  Wooble May 15 '13 at 15:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

All you need is this:

unordered.sort_by(&:to_i)
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Ah yes. Forgot about it :( –  Sergio Tulentsev May 15 '13 at 15:31
    
Exactly what I needed. Thanks! –  Samer May 15 '13 at 15:45

It's because you're sorting strings, not numbers. Cast to integers for sorting.

unordered.map(&:to_i).sort.map(&:to_s)

If you keep the original array as numbers, then you eliminate the problem (and gain better sorting performance (because now you don't have to map the array twice)).

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