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This question is an exact duplicate of:

I was wondering if there is a way to create a class in PHP that when compared with other variables a default value is used instead of the class itself? such that:

class Test {
    private $name;
    private $val;
    public function __construct($name, $val) {
       $this->name = $name;
       $this->val = $val;
    }
    public __default() {
        return $val;
    }
    public function getName() {
        return $name;
    }
}

then I could use a function like __default when I compare it to another value such as:

$t = new Test("Joe", 12345);
if($t == 12345) { echo "I want this to work"; }

the phrase "I want this to work" will print.

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marked as duplicate by deceze, obi NullPoiиteя kenobi, Robert K, Michael Irigoyen, jszumski May 15 '13 at 22:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I cannot use PECL but thanks –  Justin T. Watts May 15 '13 at 15:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Implement __toString() in your class.

Like:

class myClass {
    // your stuff

    public function __toString() {
        return "something, or a member property....";
    }
}
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I tried __toString but had no luck, but then tried it again and it actually did work on comparison this time after a few tries, thanks! –  Justin T. Watts May 15 '13 at 15:41

As far as I know this is not possible. The closest thing you're looking for is the __toString() method to be set on the class.

http://php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.magic.php

PHP might try to convert it to an Integer, but I'm not sure if there are class methods to accomplish this. You could try string comparison.

<?php
class Test {
    private $name;
    private $val;
    public function __construct($name, $val) {
       $this->name = $name;
       $this->val = $val;
    }
    public function __toString() {
        return (string)$this->val;
    }

    public function __toInt() {
        return $this->val;
    }

    public function getName() {
        return $this->name;
    }
}

$t = new Test("Joe", 12345);
if($t == '12345') { echo "I want this to work"; }
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately _toInt isn't a real magic method. I put it there for testing. –  Brian Moore May 15 '13 at 15:35
    
It should be as far as i'm concerned. –  Orangepill May 15 '13 at 15:41
    
Looks like it was a feature request but it was rejected bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=48076 –  Orangepill May 15 '13 at 15:43

The __toString magic method will do what you want with some caveats:

class Test {
    private $name;
    private $val;
    public function __construct($name, $val) {
       $this->name = $name;
       $this->val = $val;
    }
    public function __toString() {
        return $this->val;
    }
    public function getName() {
        return $this->name;
    }
}

Objects can't be directly cast to an integer so will always get a when comparing to an integer but if you cast either side of the comparison to a string it will work as expected.

if($t == 12345)          // false with a warning about can't cast object to integer
if((string)$t  == 12345) // true
if($t == "12345")        // true 
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Your object will unlikely equals integer. But you can implement something similar to Java's hashCode() - a class method that do some math to produce numeric hash - a return value based on i.e. its internal state, variables etc. Then compare these hash codes.

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Why not something along this line:

class Test {
    private $name;
    private $val;
    public function __construct($name, $val) {
       $this->name = $name;
       $this->val = $val;
    }
    public __default() {
        return $val;
    }

    public compare($input) {
        if($this->val == $input)
            return TRUE;
        return FALSE;
    } 

    public function getName() {
        return $name;
    }
}

$t = new Test("Joe", 12345);
if($t->compare(12345)) { echo "I want this to work"; }

From other answers it appears there is not a built in function to handle this.

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because I want it to be seamless that the properties that will be used are still values, but yet I can trace back what class and property they came from. –  Justin T. Watts May 15 '13 at 15:36

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