Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So this is kind of a homework question, I've been thinking about it for quite a while, and came up with a couple of solutions but I think a better one exists.

What's the fastest way to determine if there is an element (int) in the array that appears only once? Any element can appear any number of times. {3, 1, 4, 1, 4, 3} will return false while {3, 1, 4, 1, 4, 1} would return true (3 appears once).

We are only allowed to use things we already learned (all the basics, recursion, oop, searching and sorting algos, including quicksort) so making a hash table is not an option.

So far the best practical solution I came up with is sorting it using quicksort then going through it ( O(nlogn) ), the best unpractical solution I came up with is making a big array the size of all possible int values and then using it's place similar to a hash table (but that array is WAY too big to actually implement) ( O(n) )

Is there another (practical) way to do this in O(n) time?

EDIT: just got an answer from the TA, the suggested O(n) solution that I heard about was an unpractical one (the same or similar to what I suggested) and hence they told us not to use it. I'm 99% sure now that the best practical answer (without hash tables) is O(nlogn) time. Thanks for all the suggestions and ideas everyone!

share|improve this question
1  
You could create a Map<Integer, Integer>, where the key would be the number in the array and you would increment the value for every occurence in the array. Then find out all the keys, where value is 1. –  NeplatnyUdaj May 15 '13 at 15:55
2  
@NeplatnyUdaj OP: "making a hash table is not an option" –  Ziyao Wei May 15 '13 at 15:55
3  
Also, assuming ints in java are 32 bits - radix sort gives you O(d*n) where d=32, so O(n). Though arrays are limited to <2^32 size, so logn is also smaller then 32. No practical gain here –  amit May 15 '13 at 16:05
1  
@kkaploon oh okay. Sorry I misunderstood. –  Nicolás Carlo May 15 '13 at 16:21
2  
Do you have actual memory constraints? You really only need 2 bits per possible int, so you could use the big array solution and only need about 1GB. –  Aaron Dufour May 15 '13 at 21:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use a customised quicksort to find distinct values without iterating over the sorted array afterwards.

When you have chosen a pivot value and are moving through the respective part of the array, IF the value matches the pivot, discard it AND discard the pivot value after you have moved through the part of the array, this would remove duplicates BEFORE the array is eventually sorted.

ie:

Sorting [5, 1, 4, 1, 4, 1]
If you choose the pivot as 4, you'd end up with the 2 sub arrays being:
[1, 1, 1] and [5]

If your pivot is never discarded, it is distinct, if it is discarded do the same process on the sublists. If a sublist has only 1 element, it is distinct.

In this way you can pick up distinct values MUCH earlier.

Edit: Yes this is still bounded by O(nlogn) ( I think ?)

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 In worst case it is O(nlogn) but I upvoted for suggesting the use of sorting to figure out the problem. This probably so far IS the best solution because he doesn't have to iterate over it after sorting. –  Nicolás Carlo May 15 '13 at 16:31
    
This doesn't exactly answer my question, but seeing as my specific question (an algorithm with O(n) time without hash tables) cannot be answered, this is the closest thing to it, as it improves my answer (even if keeping the same time complexity). –  kkaploon May 19 '13 at 15:41

You essentially have to do a bubble-sort style compare. There's no built-in function to answer the problem, and even if you sort, you still have to iterate over every element (even just to find when groups break). You could do some more complicated approaches with multiple arrays, especially if you need to find which elements return only once.

But once you find one that appears once, you can break. This code would do it. It's O(n^2), but I'm not sure you can do faster for this problem.

boolean anySingles(int[] data])
{
 outer:
 for (int i = 0; i < data.length - 1; i++)
 {
  for (int j = 0; i < data.length; j++)
  {
   if (i != j)
   {
    if (data[i] == data[j]) continue outer;
   }
  }
  // made it to the end without finding a duplicate
  return true;
 }
 return false;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thats O(n^2). Its worse. –  Nicolás Carlo May 15 '13 at 16:19
2  
He already suggested O(nlogn) solution - sort and iterate. –  amit May 15 '13 at 16:19
1  
This is worse than the best solution that OP already has, which is O(nlogn). –  Vivin Paliath May 15 '13 at 16:22

Let's do an experiment:

package test;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.Set;

/**
 * Created with IntelliJ IDEA.
 * User: Nicholas
 * Date: 15.05.13
 * Time: 21:16
 */
public class Searcher {

    private static boolean searchBySorting(int [] array){
        int [] newArray = new int[array.length];
        System.arraycopy(array, 0, newArray,0, array.length);

        Arrays.sort(newArray);
        for (int i = 0; i < newArray.length - 2; ++i){
            if(newArray[i] == newArray[i + 1]){
                return true;
            }
        }

        return false;
    }

    private static boolean searchByCompare(int [] array){
        int [] newArray = new int[array.length];
        System.arraycopy(array, 0, newArray,0, array.length);

        for (int i = 0; i < newArray.length - 1; ++i){
            int value = newArray[i];
            for(int j = i + 1; j < newArray.length - 1; ++j){
                if(value == newArray[j]){
                    return true;
                }
            }
        }

        return false;
    }

    private static boolean searchBySet(int [] array){
        int [] newArray = new int[array.length];
        System.arraycopy(array, 0, newArray,0, array.length);

        Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>();
        for (int i = 0; i < newArray.length; ++i){
            if(set.contains(newArray[i])){
                return true;
            }

            set.add(newArray[i]);
        }

        return false;
    }

    private static int [] generateRandomArray(){
        Random random = new Random();
        int size = random.nextInt(1000) + 100;
        int [] array = new int[size];

        for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i){
            array[i] = random.nextInt();
        }

        return array;
    }

    public static void main(String [] args){

        long sortingTime = 0;
        long compareTime = 0;
        long setTime = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; ++i){
            int [] array = generateRandomArray();

            long begin = System.currentTimeMillis();
            for(int j = 0; j < 100; ++j){
                searchBySorting(array);
            }
            long end = System.currentTimeMillis();
            sortingTime += (end - begin);

            begin = System.currentTimeMillis();
            for(int j = 0; j < 100; ++j){
                searchByCompare(array);
            }
            end = System.currentTimeMillis();
            compareTime += (end - begin);

            begin = System.currentTimeMillis();
            for(int j = 0; j < 100; ++j){
                searchBySet(array);
            }
            end = System.currentTimeMillis();
            setTime += (end - begin);
        }

        System.out.println("Search by sorting: " + sortingTime + " ms");
        System.out.println("Search by compare: " + compareTime + " ms");
        System.out.println("Search by insert: " + setTime + " ms");
    }
}

My results:

Search by sorting: 2136 ms

Search by compare: 11955 ms

Search by insert: 4151 ms

Are there any questions?

PS. The best algorithm I know is Tortoise and hare

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I have a question: What is your conclusion, is there any better solution than the one in the question which runs in O(nlogn) without violating restrictions (non use of hash tables)? –  zafeiris.m May 15 '13 at 18:04
    
Sorry for incomplete answer. I have edited my post. –  gluckonavt May 15 '13 at 18:26
    
This answer looks like it returns true if any element appears at least twice, not if every element appears at least twice. –  Dave L. Aug 2 '13 at 5:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.