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I have a very unique problem, and I am not sure as to how I should tackle it, whether there is a best way to tackle it, and/or if this is a design pattern flaw.

The reason for asking is that I believe I should not have to re-write functions for the same functionality. Take below the example code;

 function Div(config) {

     var config = config || {};
     this.element = document.createElement("div");
     this.setSize(config.width || 0, config.height || 0);
 };

 Div.prototype.setSize = function(width, height) {

     this.setWidth(width);
     this.setHeight(height);
 };

 Div.prototype.setWidth = function(width) {

     this.element.style.width = width + "px";
 };

 Div.prototype.setHeight = function(height) {

     this.element.style.height = height + "px";
 };

 Div.prototype.appendTo = function(element) {

     element.appendChild(this.element);
 };

You can see that the above code allows me to create div tags. I can easily create html divs, set their size and append them to other elements.

I also have an Overlay object which needs to inherit Div. At first I decided to set Div as Overlay's prototype.

 function Overlay(config) {

      var config = config || {};
      this.setSize(config.width, config.height);
 };

 Overlay.prototype = new Div();

This worked fine, but the problem arises because Overlay is essentially a Div with some added functionality. As the Overlay object has Div as its prototype it only points to one div element, whereas each instance of Overlay should have its own div element.

I then decided to make Div a property of Overlay;

 function Overlay(config) {

     var config = config || {};
     this.div = new Div(config);
 };

This also works fine, but now when creating instances of Overlay I would have to use it like so;

 var overlay = new Overlay();
 overlay.div.setSize(100, 100);

Rather than;

 var overlay = new Overlay();
 overlay.setSize(100, 100);

To tackle this I created new prototypal functions on Overlay to simplify using it, Overlay as it stands now looks like this;

 function Overlay(config) {

     var config = config || {};
     this.div = new Div(config);
 };

 Overlay.prototype.setSize = function(width, height) {

     this.div.setWidth(width);
     this.div.setHeight(height);
 };

 Overlay.prototype.setWidth = function(width) {

     this.div.setWidth(width);
 };

 Overlay.prototype.setHeight = function(height) {

     this.div.setHeight(height);
 };

 Overlay.prototype.appendTo = function(element) {

     this.div.appendTo(element);
 };

Creating Overlay like this is exactly how I want the functionality for Overlay to be, but it seems very wrong to me that this is how it should be done as I am literally writing functions for the sake of ease of use, and as Div grows in size maintainability would become a real pain.

Whereas setting Div as Overlay's prototype seems the correct way to do things, but in my case it obviously isn't as then all instances of Overlay are tied to the same div element.

How can I create both a Div object, and an Overlay object, where Overlay will have its own instance of Div but will also inherit all of Div's functionality to its prototype? Is there a pattern that I should be using to tackle this problem I am facing?

I am literally stuck as to where to go from here, but I think I am pretty sure that the way I am doing it now is not the correct way!

Thanks for taking the time to read my question.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To make your code work and allow you to remove all those added functions, add the following into your Overlay constructor:

Div.call(this);

And add this line after declaring the Overlay constructor:

Overlay.prototype = Object.create(Div.prototype);

EXPLANATION: Here is a more verbose breakdown of what we're doing. First, define the Div constructor and give its prototype some functionality:

function Div() {
    this.propA = true;
}
Div.prototype.sayMyProp = function(){
   alert(this.propA);   
};

Define the Overlay constructor:

function Overlay() {
    Div.call(this);  // This gives any Overlay object the properties of Div
    // Define some properties specific to Overlay
    this.propB = true;
}

Create a new prototype for Overlay that inherits from Div's prototype:

Overlay.prototype = Object.create(Div.prototype);

Note that this does not copy the properties of Div.prototype onto Overlay.prototype, it just creates an Overlay.prototype object which has a "parent" reference to Div.prototype. Overlay.prototype has no properties of its own (though it would have had a constructor property if we had not overwritten it). Next, test our structure by creating two instances of Overlay:

var o1 = new Overlay();
var o2 = new Overlay();

o1.propA = false;  // Does not change o2.propA because it is an "own"
                   // property of Overlay instances

They have access to the functions on Div's prototype:

o1.sayMyProp();    // FALSE
o2.sayMyProp();    // TRUE, so they are not sharing the same propA

FIDDLE: Here is a FIDDLE

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you this is very helpful! I knew I was doing something wrong somewhere. –  GriffLab May 15 '13 at 17:23

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