Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Hello I have the following question:

I have a bidimensional array which look like this:

[[2, C, 22, 22, 8]
[2, C, 22, 22, 7]
[2, C, 22, 22, 10]
[1, R, 45, 45, 4]
[1, R, 45, 45, 3]
[1, R, 45, 45, 2]
[1, R, 45, 45, 1]
[1, R, 150, 100, 6]
[1, R, 150, 100, 5] 
[1, C, 22, 22, 9]]

And I want to order the data first for column 1, then for column 2, then for column 3, then for column 4, then for column 5; all in descending order. The following is the result that I want to obtain:

[[2, C, 22, 22, 10]
[2, C, 22, 22, 8]
[2, C, 22, 22, 7]
[1, R, 150, 100, 6]
[1, R, 150, 100, 5]
[1, R, 45, 45, 4]
[1, R, 45, 45, 3]
[1, R, 45, 45, 2]
[1, R, 45, 45, 1]
[1, C, 22, 22, 9]]

I use ExtendScript which is an extended version of Javascript for Adobe. How is this possible with Javascript? Any suggestions would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Had the numbers flipped. Updated with working example.

You can use Array.prototype.sort then loop through the options. (make sure to put quotes around your strings though!)

var x = [[2, "C", 22, 22, 8],
[2, "C", 22, 22, 7],
[2, "C", 22, 22, 10],
[1, "R", 45, 45, 4],
[1, "R", 45, 45, 3],
[1, "R", 45, 45, 2],
[1, "R", 45, 45, 1],
[1, "R", 150, 100, 6],
[1, "R", 150, 100, 5] ,
[1, "C", 22, 22, 9]];


x.sort(function(a,b){
    for(var i=0; i<a.length; i++) {
        if(a[i] > b[i]) {
            return -1;
        }
        if(a[i] < b[i]) {
            return 1;
        }

    }
    return 0;
})

Note that I'm assuming that all arrays are the same length and that a simple < and > is sufficient for comparison. If your needs differ it should be trivial to adapt to that.

Working example: http://jsfiddle.net/zSHw9/

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, this worked great! Thank you very much! –  lglmrc May 15 '13 at 16:38
    
I'm not sure why this seems to work since "C" - "R" is NaN. –  basilikum May 15 '13 at 16:38
    
No, i just checked it. If you change [1, "C", 22, 22, 9] to [1, "Z", 22, 22, 9], it will still be placed at the end of the sorted array but it should be at index 3. –  basilikum May 15 '13 at 16:46
    
@basilikum Good point. I got too clever trying to condense it. Switched it back to the original solution with < and > –  Ben McCormick May 15 '13 at 16:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.