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I have following setup:

app/models/my_module/service.rb

module MyModule
  class Service < ActiveRecord::Base
    def self.types
      self.subclasses
    end

    def self.raw_types
      self.types.map { |c| c.name.split("::").last }
    end
  end
end

require_dependency "my_module/service/rack"
require_dependency "my_module/service/rails"
require_dependency "my_module/service/sinatra"

app/models/my_module/service/rack.rb:

module MyModule
  class Service::Rack < Service
  end
end

app/models/my_module/service/rails.rb:

module MyModule
  class Service::Rails < Service
  end
end

app/models/my_module/service/sinatra.rb:

module MyModule
  class Service::Sinatra < Service
  end
end

That works so far, but now my question:

Why I have to add these three lines:

require_dependency "my_module/service/rack"
require_dependency "my_module/service/rails"
require_dependency "my_module/service/sinatra"

to my service.rb file?

If I don't add the three lines:

MyModule::Service.raw_types
=> []

If I add the three lines:

MyModule::Service.raw_types
=> ["Rack", "Rails", "Sinatra"]

Anybody an idea?

Btw: I use Ruby 2.0.0-preview1, Rails 4.0.0.rc1 and create a new Rails engine with

rails plugin new MyModule
share|improve this question
    
Does MyModule::Service.types work? –  Betty St May 15 '13 at 16:30
    
Is the question why do have to require the files or why the array gets populated? When you require the files you add 3 classes which all subclass Service, hence Service.subclasses returns those 3 classes. –  Kris May 15 '13 at 16:34
    
Idea: one of the files monkey-patches subclasses into Class. –  User May 15 '13 at 16:34
    
BettySt: only if I require the files in my parent class. Kris: my question is why I have to require the three files, and not the method call, which points to the subclasses requires my files automatically, because the classes are called through the parent class implicit. User: what do you mean? I have not defined any monkey patch yet. –  Mattherick May 15 '13 at 20:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

By default, in the development environment, Rails will autoload constants in the usual subdirectories of app, by looking in the conventional place (e.g., /app/models/my_module/service/rack.rb for MyModule::Service::Rack). This autoloading happens when the constant is referenced for the first time, not on app initialization.

But this means that before the constant is referenced, the file that defines it is not loaded unless it is explicitly required.

Thus, when you call MyModule::Service.raw_types, MyModule::Service is loaded from app/models/my_module/service.rb if it isn't already defined. However, if no reference has yet been made to its subclasses, those constants won't be defined unless the files that define them are explicitly required. Thus, requiring those files in the file that is autoloaded on that method call makes them available.

Moral: if you want to ensure that the subclasses of MyModule::Service are always defined whenever MyModule::Service is, you need to require them in /app/models/my_module/service.rb

share|improve this answer
    
Okay I thought that already, but I hoped, that Rails fixes the autoloading while the method get called, because the classes are needed through a parent class method call.. could it be a Rails bug? I understand the loading from a "ruby view", but not from the "rails view".. –  Mattherick May 15 '13 at 20:05
2  
This is not a bug in Rails. How is the application supposed to know that those constants are needed when it doesn't even know they exist? I don't think there's any harm in requiring your subclasses in the file that defines the superclass. Alternatively, you could load them all in config/boot.rb so they'll be there on app initialization. –  gregates May 16 '13 at 13:53
    
But it would be really good, if Rails has such a behavior that it searches the sub folder which is called like the module around the parent class to check if there are subclasses defined. That would be great :). But anyway I just will load them all through the rails initialization process. –  Mattherick May 16 '13 at 20:27
    
Btw +1 for your explanation. –  Mattherick May 16 '13 at 20:29

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