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    private void AllowOtherSelectors(bool value)
    {
        foreach (var c in this.Parent.Controls)
        {
            if (c == this)
                continue;
            if (!(c is RoundGroupedSelector))
                continue;
            var rgs = c as RoundGroupedSelector;

            rgs.AllowMultiple = value;
        }
    }

Although this code works... I feel that it can benefit from using LINQ. This program will be used on a tablet with Atom processors, so i'm just looking for the least resources/cycles used.

share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Well, I'd still use a foreach loop, but you can use LINQ for the query part:

foreach (var c in Parent.Controls
                        .OfType<RoundGroupedSelector>()
                        .Where(x => x != this))
{
    c.AllowMultiple = value;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
rgs should be c – Chamika Sandamal May 15 '13 at 16:29
1  
@RobertSnyder John can correct me if I'm wrong but I'm pretty sure LINQ doesn't offer inherently better performance than iteration. Just general thing since you said performance is important here. – evanmcdonnal May 15 '13 at 16:30

I would definitely go for Jon's answer, but just to address your point about "least cycles used" you could possibly make it a bit faster like this:

private void AllowOtherSelectors(bool value)
{
    var saved = this.AllowMultiple;

    foreach (var c in this.Parent.Controls)
    {
        var rgs = c as RoundGroupedSelector;

        if (rgs != null)
            rgs.AllowMultiple = value;
    }

    this.AllowMultiple = saved;
}

I have avoided the if (c == this) test per iteration by making a copy of this.AllowMultiple before the loop and restoring it after. I also removed the redundant use of is.

This would only speed things up if there are quite a few controls and if assigning this.AllowMultiple is very fast and has no side-effects.

I must stress that this kind of micro-optimisation is generally completely pointless, and if you do this kind of thing you must instrument it to see if it really is any faster.

I'm posting this here just for the sake of interest. I'm definitely NOT suggesting that you should actually do this! :)

share|improve this answer
1  
you highlight a important flaw in my character... overrly concerned. The Form that this is going in will have 3 of these RoundGroupedSelectors, 3 buttons, and probably 2 labels. so like you said being concerned with the cycles was probably a shame on me. I put my program on one of the tablets and it works great. The LINQ doesn't perceptibly slow it down at all. – Robert Snyder May 15 '13 at 16:50
    
but your post did bring somethign to my knowledge. I didn't know that as would return null and not throw a error. I figured I would get a illegal cast operation. – Robert Snyder May 15 '13 at 16:51
    
@RobertSnyder Hah, less than six controls... yep, use Jon's code. :) – Matthew Watson May 15 '13 at 16:57

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