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I have run into another issue that apparently deals with inherited classes:

I have for instance this super class.

public class Person 
{
    public string Firstname { get; set; }
    public string Lastname { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
}

And then a sub class:

public class Member : Person
{
    public int MembershipId  { get; set; }
    public string Password { get; set; }
    public List<Foo> Foos { get; set; }
}

When I return a Member with the following code, I get nothing useful:

[OperationContract]
[WebGet(ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json, BodyStyle = WebMessageBodyStyle.WrappedRequest)]
public Member GetMember()
{
    return new Member 
    { 
         Firstname = "Jane", 
         Lastname = "Doe", 
         Email = "jane.doe@doe.com",
         MembershipId = 10,
         Password = "*****",
         Foos = new List<Foo> { };  
    };
}

Classes / objects that are not inherited are serialized and returned in json format without any problems.

Is there anyway to get my Member object returned correctly, please? I have been messing with this issue and my conclusion was that it must have something to do with inherited classes and json.

share|improve this question
    
What is the error that you get? –  carlosfigueira May 16 '13 at 22:57
    
I don't get any errors. It just hangs and says waiting for localhost in the browser. Nothing in the eventlog either. –  codingjoe May 17 '13 at 8:49
    
{"d":[{"__type":"MyObject:#MywebApp.Entities"},{"__type":"MyObject:#MywebApp.Entit‌​ies"},{"__type":"MyObject:#MywebApp.Entities"} <- I actually just get this. –  codingjoe May 17 '13 at 18:06
    
It is very odd. If I hard code all the values into my object, it returns a serialized JSON string without any problems. If I populate my object dynamically from a database, then nothing works. I will update this thread as soon as I solve this... –  codingjoe May 18 '13 at 7:46
    
Serializing it to xml revealed a lot of errors. Apparently IEnumerable and dictionary/hashtables are not liked during xml serialization. It must be the same problems during JSON serialization. –  codingjoe May 18 '13 at 8:24

3 Answers 3

try this fix

[DataContract]
public class Person 
{
    [DataMember]
    public string Firstname { get; set; }
    [DataMember]
    public string Lastname { get; set; }
    [DataMember]
    public string Email { get; set; }
}
[DataContract]
public class Member : Person
{
    [DataMember]
    public string MembershipId  { get; set; }
    [DataMember]
    public string Password { get; set; }
    [DataMember]
    public List<Foo> Foos { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer

Actually my theory about inherited classes and JSON serialization was flawed. It works and I do not need the [Datacontrac] and [Datamember] decorators. Something else is wrong. Perhaps my structure is too deep and too lenghty. I wonder whether JSON has some limits regarding size.

share|improve this answer
    
I never found out what the problem was, and nothing showed up in tamper data or fiddler. My conclusion is still that the native json feature in .net is not stable. I had to use Newtonsoft's json.net instead. –  codingjoe Jun 3 '13 at 9:45
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended using JSON.net from Newtonsoft. I would recommend to use that instead of wasting time on the native json feature in .net.

http://json.codeplex.com/

share|improve this answer
    
In addition to my answer here, I can see that I am double encoding JSON instead. Due to my ResponseFormat = WebMessageFormat.Json. I am now trying to figure out, how to return pure string/plaintext from my wcf service, so it does not get doubly json encoded. –  codingjoe Jun 3 '13 at 9:44

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