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The problem: We develop systems for banks. These systems are (theoretically) highly secure and almost always protected by quite fierce NDA's. Consequently, whilst there is some shared code between the various projects, a lot of it is entirely separate. That said, it would be catastrophic if code or documentation from one project 'bled' into another project owned by a different client. This problem is exacerbated by two clients requiring that we push code to their repo (part of our contractual requirements).

Hitherto, we've simply used a completely independent repo for each client. Of course this means that in some cases we have duplicates of the same code modules; changes/fixes are inevitably lost if an update is made in one repo and not distributed to the others. It would be much better if we only had to maintain one copy of such files.

Another approach, of course would be to use a branch for each client but I've found the overhead of merging between branches is unsupportable. Also, I've looked at git sub-modules but, again, these seem to be too fraught with peril in that a careless commit could comprise the 'Chinese walls' between the projects and merging seems to be even more complicated than just by forking the project (see http://codingkilledthecat.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/why-your-company-shouldnt-use-git-submodules/). I hate implementing systems where a developer has to remember a particular procedure because, when things are done in a hurry, mistakes are inevitable.

Obviously first prize would be to have one single repository but where only certain directories or files are uploaded to a specific remote repo. While I appreciate that this could be accomplished to a certain extent by using .gitignore and individual branches per client, I'm concerned that finger-trouble (if someone edits the .gitignore file inappropriately), could cause the very thing I'm trying to avoid.

Almost all of our development platforms are Linux based but the development environment for one legacy system can only operate on Windows XP and it won't run under Wine for some reason (linked to the Java runtime I suspect but that's a story for another day).

I've considered using rsync or symbolic links to share the common files but it seems tacky and may also cause trouble if some idiot changes the file dates on old versions of a source module. At the moment we have too many individual repositories and duplicate modules for my liking and I can see it causing trouble down the track. I figure this must be a fairly common problem and I'm sure someone has handled it in a stable, platform-independent way that doesn't assume developers never make mistakes on commits.

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3 Answers 3

I would expect that given this:

Of course this means that in some cases we have duplicates of the same code modules; changes/fixes are inevitably lost if an update is made in one repo and not distributed to the others. It would be much better if we only had to maintain one copy of such files.

the solution would be to maintain common repos (not tied to any client) to build library components. That way you'd build different versions of your libraries (versioned appropriately) and different releases of client code would consume those libraries, rather than import the actual code.

I would normally store different (succesive) versions of these libraries and specify in a client's code base which version of the library to use. The library projects would define the library tests etc. and by changing a version number in the client project you could dictate which version of the library (e.g. a new version with a fix) to consume.

Obviously first prize would be to have one single repository but where only certain directories or files are uploaded to a specific remote repo

I don't think this is scaleable or practical for the reasons above. I think you're far better off being able to sandbox your development and make the resultant binaries available for downstream consumption. If I checkout a new client repository I don't have to rebuild all the dependent code, but simply download the artifact (and possibly the source code too, if your repository supports that)

Various solutions exist for distributing binary deployments (e.g. in the Java world, check out Sonatype's Nexus and its integration with the Maven buildtool. Nexus/Maven support the download of packaged source code alongside the binary).

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We already do this wherever possible but it makes for too much maintenance activity. Also, some of the device platforms we are obliged to use don't really lend themselves to libraries. Also, some of this code has been in the field for nearly a decade and excising all the generics in such a way as to create a standard library interface would be a massive exercise in itself. It would also mean we'd have to go through a new certification process for each client for their existing systems in the field which would cost a fortune. –  user2336261 May 15 '13 at 16:57

Have you considered creating a repository for the common modules and code and cloning that into each project repo? This way you can use the same core code base for each project, while still keeping them separate for your clients.

If you decided, you can even use a different branch of the core modules if there are conflicts during updates for any reason.

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What you need is to realize that you have components which are essentially a library. This library contains only parts which are completely independent and neutral to your projects, but needed to enable certain functionality. Such a library is added as a submodule or tree and maintained and developed independently. Developers of both of your customer projects can never make an mistake because they just know to keep this library up to date and how to use it, but never change it directly. They might re-implement a specific version customized for them, but this will never be commited as it stays inside your client project.

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