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I often use with to create an object and run its methods. it makes the code look clean:

With New MyObj(...)
  .Prop1 = Val1
  .Prop2 = Val2
  .Run()
End With

however, sometimes I'd like to return the object:

With New MyObj(...)
  .Prop1 = Val1
  .Prop2 = Val2
  Return .Me
End With

but not all objects have a Me (this) property, so how can I refer to the object in question within the with?

share|improve this question
1  
You could assign the object to a variable before using the With statement, then return the object outside the block. – Asad Saeeduddin May 15 '13 at 18:16
    
Are you are looking for the VB.NET equivalent of C# return new MyObj() { Prop1 = X, Prop2 = Y };? – ja72 May 15 '13 at 19:24
    
Actually .Me is something I've never seen on any object, so had to create one myself for one of my custom classes. VB.NET should have had the . syntax, which would refer to the current With block variable. So it would be Return .. Unfortunately, does not work like that. You may find this question interesting. – Neolisk May 15 '13 at 20:57
1  
@Neolisk, haha. yes, I did try Return . but of course, it doesn't compile – ekkis May 15 '13 at 21:10
1  
@ekkis: No, unfortunately. I tried that too the first time I needed it like that. – Neolisk May 15 '13 at 22:32

I would retain a reference to the instance before starting the With block, then Return it after you're done using the members:

Dim myInstance = New MyObj(...)
With myInstance
  .Prop1 = Val1
  .Prop2 = Val2
End With
Return myInstance

You don't need to worry about garbage collection implications, since the variable you are creating goes out of scope once you return anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I realise I could do that. I was hoping there was a way to refer to the object within the With construct – ekkis May 15 '13 at 19:38
    
@ekkis What is the disadvantage to doing it this way? – Asad Saeeduddin May 15 '13 at 20:11
    
@Asad: you are repeating the variable name 3 times. – Neolisk May 15 '13 at 20:58
    
@Asad, it's just not as clean – ekkis May 15 '13 at 21:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

well, I guess the answer is that so long as I can change the definition of the object in question I can do this:

Public Class XC
    Public Self As XC = Me
End Class

With New XC()
  Dim x As XC = .Self
End With
share|improve this answer
    
It is nice but it seems that more fair answer to your original question is: It is not possible. – IvanH May 16 '13 at 7:19
    
@IvanH, it is absolutely possible. just do: With New XC(); Return .Self; End With – ekkis May 18 '13 at 3:56
    
OK. I was not precise: It is not possible when you are not allowed to change the object definition. However in most cases I A not really allowed to do it. And to add special method to all classes is annoying. – IvanH May 18 '13 at 10:40

You can use the VB object initializer syntax with Option Infer:

Dim variable As New SomeClass With
{
    .AString = "Hello",
    .AnInteger = 12345
}
return variable

You still have a variable, but it's pretty clean.

If you don't want the variable you might try code like this:

Return New SomeClass With
{
    .AString = "Hello",
    .AnInteger = 12345
}

I don't believe this syntax allows you to call methods on the instance, however. I think you can only set properties.

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