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I am new to Lex and Yacc and I am trying to create a parser for a simple language which allows for basic arithmetic and equality expressions. Though I have some of it working, I am encountering errors when trying to parse expressions involving binary operations. Here is my .y file:

%{
   #include <stdlib.h>
   #include <stdio.h>
%}

%token  NUMBER
%token  HOME
%token  PU
%token  PD
%token  FD
%token  BK
%token  RT
%token  LT

%left '+' '-'
%left '=' '<' '>'
%nonassoc UMINUS


%%

S       :       statement S                 { printf("S -> stmt S\n"); }
        |                                   { printf("S -> \n"); }
;

statement :     HOME                        { printf("stmt -> HOME\n"); }
        |       PD                          { printf("stmt -> PD\n"); }
        |       PU                          { printf("stmt -> PU\n"); }
        |       FD expression               { printf("stmt -> FD expr\n"); }
        |       BK expression               { printf("stmt -> BK expr\n"); }
        |       RT expression               { printf("stmt -> RT expr\n"); }
        |       LT expression               { printf("stmt -> LT expr\n"); }
;

expression :    expression '+' expression   { printf("expr -> expr + expr\n"); }
         |      expression '-' expression   { printf("expr -> expr - expr\n"); }
         |      expression '>' expression   { printf("expr -> expr > expr\n"); }
         |      expression '<' expression   { printf("expr -> expr < expr\n"); }
         |      expression '=' expression   { printf("expr -> expr = expr\n"); }
         |      '(' expression ')'          { printf("expr -> (expr)\n"); }
         |      '-' expression %prec UMINUS { printf("expr -> -expr\n"); }
         |      NUMBER                      { printf("expr -> number\n"); }
;

%%

int yyerror(char *s)
{
   fprintf (stderr, "%s\n", s);
   return 0;
}

int main()
{
   yyparse();
}

And here is my .l file for Lex:

%{
   #include "testYacc.h"
%}

number [0-9]+

%%
[ ]             { /* skip blanks */ }
{number}        { sscanf(yytext, "%d", &yylval); return NUMBER; }
home            { return HOME; }
pu              { return PU; }
pd              { return PD; }
fd              { return FD; }
bk              { return BK; }
rt              { return RT; }
lt              { return LT; }

%%

When I try to enter an arithmetic expression on the command-line for evaluation, it results in the following error:

home
stmt -> HOME

pu
stmt -> PU

fd 10
expr -> number

fd 10
stmt -> FD expr
expr -> number

fd (10 + 10)
stmt -> FD expr
(expr -> number
+stmt -> FD expr
S ->
S -> stmt S
S -> stmt S
S -> stmt S
S -> stmt S
S -> stmt S
syntax error
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your lexer lacks rules to match and return tokens such as '+' and '*', so if there are any in your input, it will just echo them and discard them. This is what happens when you enter fd (10 + 10) -- the lexer returns the tokens FD NUMBER NUMBER while + and ( get echoed to stdout. The parser then gives a syntax error.

You want to add a rule to return these single character tokens. The easiest is to just add a single rule to your .l file at the end:

.               { return *yytext; }

which matches any single character.

Note that this does NOT match a \n (newline), so newlines in your input will still be echoed and ignored. You might want to add them (and tabs and carriage returns) to your skip blanks rule:

[ \t\r\n]       { /* skip blanks */ }
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I was wondering about this. I though for some reason that, because + etc were quoted, they were somehow special 'primitive' operators in yacc. –  Dylan May 15 '13 at 22:24
    
They are, in yacc. That's why just returning the char value works and you don't have to define a %TOKEN for them. But they aren't special in lex/flex. –  EJP May 15 '13 at 23:36
    
I see, so in order for them to parse correctly, they need to first be defined as tokens in Lex. –  Dylan May 16 '13 at 1:12
    
Another thing I am curious about -- entering the statement (for example) bk 10 will first show expression->number and not appear to catch the bk. However, entering it again for a second time, it will parse properly, i.e. statement -> bk expr followed by expression -> number. What is the reason for this delay? –  Dylan May 16 '13 at 1:31
    
@Dylan: That's because your printf's are in the actions, which occur when the rules are reduced -- when all the symbols on the rhs of the rule have been parsed, and they're being combined into the single symbol on the lhs. Parsing goes from tokens to symbols, but the use of -> for rules confuses you into thinking in the opposite direction. –  Chris Dodd May 16 '13 at 3:06

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