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Jon Skeet spoke of the complexity of programming dates and times at the 2009 DevDays in London.

Can you give me an introduction to the ANSI C date/time functions on UNIX and indicate some of the deeper issues I should also consider when using dates and times?

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1 Answer

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Terminology

A date/time can be in two formats:

  • calendar time (a.k.a. simpletime) – time as an absolute value typically since some base time, often referred to as the Coordinated Universal Time
  • localtime (a.k.a. broken-down time) – a calendar time made up of components of year, month, day etc. which takes into account the local time zone including Daylight Saving Time if applicable.

Data types

The date/time functions and types are declared in the time.h header file.

Time can be stored as a whole number or as an instance of a structure:

  • as a number using the time_t arithmetic type – to store calendar time as the number of seconds elapsed since the UNIX epoch January 1, 1970 00:00:00

  • using the structure timeval – to store calendar time as the number of seconds and nanoseconds elapsed since the UNIX epoch January 1, 1970 00:00:00

  • using the structure tm to store localtime, it contains attributes such as the following:

    tm_hour  
    tm_min  
    tm_isdst  
    

The tm_isdst attribute above is used to indicate Daylight Saving Time (DST). If the value is positive it is DST, if the value is 0 it is not DST.

Program to print the current Coordinated Universal Time

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

int main ( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    time_t now;

    now = time ( NULL );

    printf ( "It’s %ld seconds since January 1, 1970 00:00:00", (long) now );

    return 0;
}

In the program above the function time reads the UNIX system time, subtracts that from January 1, 1970 00:00:00 (the UNIX epoch) and returns its result in seconds.

Program to print the current local time

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

int main ( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    time_t now;
    struct tm *lcltime;

    now = time ( NULL );
    lcltime = localtime ( &now );

    printf ( "The time is %d:%d\n", lcltime->tm_hour, lcltime->tm_min );

    return 0;
}

In the program above the function localtime converts the elapsed time in seconds from the UNIX epoch into the broken-down time. localtime reads the UNIX environment TZ (through a call to the tzset function) to return the time relative to the timezone and to set the tm_isdst attribute.

A typical setting of the TZ variable in UNIX (using bash) would be as follows:

export TZ=GMT

or

export TZ=US/Eastern

Program to print the current formatted Greenwich Mean Time

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

int main ( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    time_t now;
    struct tm *gmt;
    char formatted_gmt [50];

    now = time ( NULL );
    gmt = gmtime ( &now );

    strftime ( formatted_gmt, sizeof(formatted_gmt), "%I:%M %p", gmt );
    printf ( "The time is %s\n", formatted_gmt );

    return 0;
}

In the program above the function strftime provides specialised formatting of dates.

Other issues to consider

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Shouldn't the value be 'TZ=GMT0' (or, better, 'TZ=UTC0')? I use the latter for running my database servers, so they are running in a known, reliable time zone (and I live in America/Los_Angeles, or, more colloquially, US/Pacific, time zone - though I hail from the 'TZ=GMT0BST' time zone). –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 1 '09 at 16:14
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