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I have a xts object:

df <- structure(c(0L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
  0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L),
  .Dim = c(10L, 3L), .Dimnames = list(NULL, NULL),
  index = structure(c(790387200, 790473600, 790560000, 790819200, 790905600,
  790992000, 791078400, 791164800, 791424000, 791510400), tzone = "UTC",
  tclass = "Date"), .indexCLASS = "Date", tclass = "Date", .indexTZ = "UTC",
  tzone = "UTC", class = c("xts", "zoo"))
df
#            [,1] [,2] [,3]
# 1995-01-18    0    1    1
# 1995-01-19    0    1    1
# 1995-01-20    1    1    1
# 1995-01-23    1    0    1
# 1995-01-24    1    1    1
# 1995-01-25    0    1    1
# 1995-01-26    0    1    0
# 1995-01-27    0    1    1
# 1995-01-30    0    1    1
# 1995-01-31    0    0    1

Let 1 be equal to TRUE and 0 be equal to FALSE. While this is only a small subset of data, I would like to find the latest (last) occurrence when 0 turned to 1. So for the first column, this happened in 1995-1-20, second column in 1995-01-24, and third column in 1995-01-27.

I tried

max.col(t(df),"last")

But this returns the latest occurrence of 1.

What is the best way to accomplish this?

share|improve this question
    
well, better way of doing it then a for loop for each row... –  user1234440 May 15 '13 at 19:14
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can extend your max.col idea to include diff:

max.col(t(sapply(df[,-1], diff)), "last") + 1

The above assumes a data.frame with first column being the date. For an xts object (with the date in row names), do:

max.col(t(diff(df)[-1]), "last") + 1

edit correction for the issue @G.Grothendieck pointed out:

df.diff = t(diff(df)[-1])
max.col(df.diff, "last") + 1 + (rowSums(df.diff > 0) == 0)
# or put an ifelse instead and assign NA or 0 or whatever you like
share|improve this answer
    
i get NA, when i try this. I must admit that my df is an xts object –  user1234440 May 15 '13 at 19:21
    
@user1234440 - see edit, diff.xts works slightly differently - you can run the pieces to see why you were getting NA's –  eddi May 15 '13 at 19:29
    
applying this to a dataframe, i get back two numbers 5, and 8. It should return three numbers namely in the following order, 3,5,8 –  user1234440 May 15 '13 at 19:30
2  
@user1234440 - read the edit, that's because you have dates in row names, and I assumed that's a column –  eddi May 15 '13 at 19:31
1  
Note that if there were no match in a column then the answer here returns nrow(df) for that column which is indistinguishable from the case that the column ends in 0:1 so it really only works if one can guarantee in advance that every column has a match although it could be fixed up with some extra code. –  G. Grothendieck May 16 '13 at 16:02
show 6 more comments

1) regular expressions We paste together the elements of each column and then search the resulting string for everything up to and including the last occurrence of 01 . The length of this match is then returned (i.e. the match includes not just 01 but everything up to it too):

f <- function(x) attr(regexpr(".*01", paste(x, collapse = "")), "match.length")
apply(df, 2, f)
[1] 3 5 8

Note that if 01 does not appear in a column then it will return -1 for that column.

2) rollapply In this solution we compare each rolling section of width 2 to 0:1 and return the index of the last one:

tmp <- rbind(1L, coredata(df), 0L)
max.col(t(rollapply(tmp, 2, identical, c(0,1))), "last")
[1] 3 5 8

In the case that there is no match in a column it returns nrow(df)+1 for that column.

3) gt In this solution we compare each element to the next using a greater than comparison (or a less than comparison depending on which term is first).

> cdf <- coredata(df)
> max.col(cbind(TRUE, t(cdf[-nrow(df),] < cdf[-1,])), "last")
[1] 3 5 8

If a column should not match it returns 1 for that column (which is not a possible return value if there is a match).

Here is a speed comparison. The outputs are the elapsed times for 100 replications. The output is in ascending order and represents the number of seconds for 100 replications so the fastest (gt) is first.

> library(xts)
> library(rbenchmark)
> benchmark(order = "elapsed",
+ gt = { cdf <- coredata(df); max.col(cbind(TRUE, t(cdf[-nrow(df),] < cdf[-1,])), "last") },
+ regexpr = apply(df, 2, f), 
+ rollapply = { tmp <- rbind(1L, coredata(df), 0L)
+ max.col(t(rollapply(tmp, 2, identical, c(0,1))), "last") }, 
+ diff = { df.diff = t(diff(df)[-1])
+ max.col(df.diff, "last") + 1 + (rowSums(df.diff > 0) == 0) },
+ intersect = { n <- nrow(df); cols <- 1:ncol(df)
+ lastdays <- sapply(cols,function(j){max(intersect(which(df[2:n,j]==1),which(df[1:(n-1),j]==0)))+1})
+ data.frame(cols,lastdays) })
       test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
1        gt          100    0.02      1.0      0.02        0         NA        NA
2   regexpr          100    0.05      2.5      0.04        0         NA        NA
4      diff          100    0.09      4.5      0.10        0         NA        NA
5 intersect          100    0.26     13.0      0.27        0         NA        NA
3 rollapply          100    0.84     42.0      0.85        0         NA        NA
> 

I also tried 10 replications of the three fastest from above using 100,000 rows and in that case gt is still fastest and at that scale diff has moved up to second place.

> df <- xts(coredata(df)[rep(1:10, each = 10000), ], Sys.Date() + 1:100000)
> dim(df)
[1] 100000      3
> library(rbenchmark)
> benchmark(order = "elapsed", replications = 10,
+   gt = { cdf <- coredata(df); max.col(cbind(TRUE, t(cdf[-nrow(df),] < cdf[-1,])), "last") },
+   regexpr = apply(df, 2, f), 
+ diff = { df.diff = t(diff(df)[-1])
+ max.col(df.diff, "last") + 1 + (rowSums(df.diff > 0) == 0) })
     test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
1      gt           10    0.32    1.000      0.31     0.00         NA        NA
3    diff           10    6.04   18.875      5.91     0.12         NA        NA
2 regexpr           10    8.31   25.969      8.01     0.31         NA        NA

UPDATE 1: Fixed so it takes last instead of first. Also it now works with dput output in question rather than a data frame. Also simplified.

UPDATE 2: Added second solution.

UPDATE 3: Added a performance comparison (limited to the data at hand).

UPDATE 4: Added a 3rd method.

share|improve this answer
    
these are interesting approaches and would work for more interesting patterns, but they seem really slow for this particular problem –  eddi May 16 '13 at 16:19
    
The rollapply method is slowest but the regexpr method is the fastest of all the solutions provided at least on the data in the question. –  G. Grothendieck May 16 '13 at 16:44
1  
try making the data a bit larger, by doing e.g. df = rbind(df, df) a few times and bench again - regexpr method doesn't scale well (any time you're converting numbers to letters to do a fundamentally numeric operation it's very unlikely to do well) –  eddi May 16 '13 at 16:49
    
huh? I don't know what you did, but on my PC, rbinding, at 300 rows diff catches up and it's downhill from there for regexpr –  eddi May 16 '13 at 17:10
    
@G.Grothendieck I see what @eddi does (regex adding 80% to the time) using your benchmark with nrep <- 1e2; dfg <- xts(coredata(df)[rep(1:10, nrep), ], Sys.Date() + 1:(10*nrep)). I don't know anything about xts objects, but saw something like this in your answer briefly. I like the simplicity of collapse paste+regex solutions, so I'd be interested in seeing evidence that they're not too slow. –  Frank May 16 '13 at 17:34
show 2 more comments

How about this?

n <- nrow(df)
cols <- 1:ncol(df)
lastdays <- sapply(cols,function(j){max(intersect(which(df[2:n,j]==1),which(df[1:(n-1),j]==0)))+1})
data.frame(cols,lastdays)

If one were working with a vanilla data frame, the second step could be changed to...

lastdays <- sapply(cols,function(j){max(which(df[2:n,j]==1&df[1:(n-1),j]==0))+1})
share|improve this answer
    
@G.Grothendieck: I edited the dput output into the question. The OP did not include it originally and the question said they had a data.frame; even though they said it was really an xts object in the comments to an answer. –  Joshua Ulrich May 15 '13 at 20:20
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