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As I understand it, ctrl-d and ctrl-u scroll the window by the number of lines that is set in the scroll option, which defaults to half of the height of the window. Can it be changed to scroll by a third of the window height?

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Ooh, getting this to happen in less too would be great. –  alxndr May 15 '13 at 20:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use following ex command. It uses the variable lines that show how many lines are shown in a window and calculates the third.

:execute "set scroll=" .&lines / 3

EDIT: When window is resized the scroll value won't change, so add following autocommand to your vimrc to fix it:

:au VimResized * execute "set scroll=" . &lines / 3
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That'll do the trick! Thanks –  alxndr May 19 '13 at 4:17
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@Alexander, &lines is the height of Vim as a whole, not the height of the current window. Use winheight('.') to get the height of the current window. –  romainl May 19 '13 at 6:01

The default value of scroll is dynamic — could be 12 in one window and 21 in another one — but the proportion, 50%, is hardcoded. AFAIK, that proportion used to calculate scroll dynamically can't be modified.

You can change the value of scroll pretty easily with something like this:

execute "set scroll=" . winheight('.') / 3

Now you must find how, when and where to use that snippet. An autocmd seems to be a good choice choice but what event shall we use? WinEnter/WinLeave? CursorMove? Something else?

Maybe a simple mapping that overrides the default? Something like:

nnoremap <C-d> :execute "normal! " . winheight('.') / 3 . "^D"<CR>
" type <C-v> then <C-d> to produce ^D
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