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I have a custom HTTP Module. I would like to inject the logger using my IoC framework, so I can log errors in the module. However, of course I don't get a constructor, so can't inject it into that. What's the best way to go about this?

If you need the specific IoC container - I'm currently using Windsor, but may soon move to AutoFac.

Thanks

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You could use a service locator, take a look at this question: Difference between dependency injection and service locator pattern –  FinnNk Nov 1 '09 at 16:00

4 Answers 4

First time I saw dependency injection to HttpModules in Spring.NET (not advertising this framework though). The idea is that you have special HttpModule which injects dependencies to other application-level HttpModule-s.

Unfortunatelly current version of Autofac.Integration.Web does not support this, but you can easily do that yourself:

public class MyModule : IHttpModule
{
    public void Dispose()
    {            
    }

    public void Init(HttpApplication context)
    {
        Assert.IsNotNull(MyService);
    }        

    public IMyService MyService { get; set; }
}

public class HttpModuleInjectionModule : IHttpModule
{
    public void Dispose()
    {            
    }

    public void Init(HttpApplication context)
    {
        var containerProviderAccessor = context as IContainerProviderAccessor;

        if(containerProviderAccessor == null)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("HttpApplication should implement IContainerProviderAccessor");

        var rootContainer = containerProviderAccessor.ContainerProvider.ApplicationContainer;

        foreach (string moduleName in context.Modules.AllKeys)
            rootContainer.InjectProperties(context.Modules[moduleName]);
    }
}

public class Global : HttpApplication, IContainerProviderAccessor
{
  static IContainerProvider _containerProvider;

  protected void Application_Start(object sender, EventArgs e)
  {
    var builder = new ContainerBuilder();
    builder.Register<MyService>().As<IMyService>();
    _containerProvider = new ContainerProvider(builder.Build());
  }

  public IContainerProvider ContainerProvider
  {
    get { return _containerProvider; }
  }
}

HttpModuleInjectionModule should be registered before other HttpModule-s in web.config:

  <httpModules>
   <add name="ScriptModule" type="System.Web.Handlers.ScriptModule, System.Web.Extensions, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31BF3856AD364E35"/>
   <add name="HttpModuleInjection" type="WebTest.HttpModuleInjectionModule, WebTest"/>
   <add name="ContainerDisposal" type="Autofac.Integration.Web.ContainerDisposalModule, Autofac.Integration.Web"/>
   <add name="PropertyInjection" type="Autofac.Integration.Web.PropertyInjectionModule, Autofac.Integration.Web"/>
   <add name="MyModule" type="WebTest.MyModule, WebTest"/>
  </httpModules>

I'm sure you can do similar things in Windsor. The difference would be in how you access your root container from HttpModuleInjectionModule.

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this is pretty limited, can't do constructor injection. –  Mauricio Scheffer Oct 7 '10 at 20:38

You could pass in the required dependencies via the HttpApplication context passed to you by the Init method...

public class MyHttpModule : IHttpModule
{
    public void Init(HttpApplication context)
    {
        var dependency = (IDependency)context.Context.Items["dependency"];
        // consume dependency...
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
    }
}
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2  
-1 because it's very hard to mock out dependencies this way –  Mauricio Scheffer Nov 3 '09 at 15:48
    
@Mauricio Scheffer: Perhaps, but then just implement the module as a Humble Executable. I prefer that approach over using static injection. People think it helps testability, but it really hurts it. –  Mark Seemann Nov 3 '09 at 16:22
1  
Humble Executable certainly works well in this case, I would add that piece of information to the answer. However, you can have your cake and eat it too, see my solution. –  Mauricio Scheffer Nov 3 '09 at 16:41
1  
Is this solution considered an implementation of Service Location Design Pattern? –  Parth Shah Sep 3 '14 at 3:15
    
@ParthShah Good observation. Yes, it's a variation of the Service Locator anti-pattern. The only reason I suggested it is because of the constraints of implementing an IHttpModule. –  Mark Seemann Sep 3 '14 at 7:25

I am curious about andrey-tsykunov's answer, but don't have the rep to comment on it.

I am trying to get comfortable with IoC and DI, so I may be missing something, but wouldn't it be simpler to use IContainerProviderAccessor from within MyModule, rather than create another module?

For example:

public class MyModule : IHttpModule
{
    public void Dispose()
    {            
    }

    public void Init(HttpApplication context)
    {
        Assert.IsNotNull(MyService);

        var containerProviderAccessor = context as IContainerProviderAccessor;

        if (accessor != null)
        {
            IContainer container = containerProviderAccessor.ContainerProvider.ApplicationContainer;
            MyService = container.Resolve<IMyService>();
        }
    }

    private IMyService MyService { get; set; }
}
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2  
You're not doing dependency injection here, you're doing service location. –  Mauricio Scheffer Oct 7 '10 at 20:40
    
Looks like you got the rep thing sorted :P –  Ruben Bartelink Sep 20 '14 at 7:47

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