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This was a question on my assignment:

Which of the following is not an acceptable way of indicating comments? Why?

  • /** comment */
  • /* comment */
  • // comment
  • // comment comment
  • /*comment comment */

In all honestly, they all look fine to me. But I was thinking that it could be /** comment */ because it's not multi-lined in the example but that's its purpose--documentation. What do you think? This is the only question that's giving me a hard time. Any help would be appreciated! Thank you.

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1  
The first one might end up in your javadoc depending on its location. –  assylias May 15 '13 at 20:52

4 Answers 4

In terms of grammar, none of the above ways of indicating comments is not acceptable. However, to make other people easier to understand your code, then I would suggest to follow some of the major coding styles.

For example, the Oracle coding style is one of the popular coding styles for Java.

In its coding style, there are two types of comments. The first is implementation comment, which uses /* */ for block comments and // for single line comments.

    /*
     * Here is a block comment.
     */


    // Here is a single line comment.

The second type is the documentation comment, which usually uses /** */ styled comment and only appears right before the class, function, and variable definitions. For example:

    /**
     * Documentation for some class.
     */
    public class someClass {

      /**
       * Documentation for the constructor.
       * @param someParam blah blah blah
       */
      public someClass(int someParam) {
        ...
      }
      ...
    }
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1  
Perfect answer +1 –  Azad May 15 '13 at 21:58

The first bullet:

 /** comment */

This type of comment is for documentation. Source: http://journals.ecs.soton.ac.uk/java/tutorial/getStarted/application/comments.html

Just pointing this out since it's different from the other types of comments. You could be right about the multi-line comment though.

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2  
How does that make it "not an acceptable way of indicating comments?" –  tieTYT May 15 '13 at 20:57
    
Well it depends on what unacceptable means. Unacceptable as in it gives an error, or it isn't being used for it's proper purpose. –  An Alien May 15 '13 at 21:00
2  
Javadoc is not the same as comments in code, so that makes using Javadoc format for regular in-code comments "an unacceptable way of indicating comments". Hope that helps. –  Scott Shipp May 15 '13 at 21:03
    
@ScottShipp +1 for articulating it for me. –  An Alien May 15 '13 at 21:04
1  
I understand what you all mean. Thank you for your help! –  Salma May 15 '13 at 21:06

The Java language specification states that there are two kinds of comments, "//" and "/* ... */".

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se5.0/html/lexical.html#3.7

It is a trick question. But since /** ... */ is used by JavaDoc tools to create JavaDocs, I would say the first choice is not an acceptable answer.

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1  
Although, now that I think about it, it might that the question is not formatted correctly and the fourth option implies multi-line comments meaning the second "comment" is on a separate line without the leading "//". So if that's the case, that's the unacceptable answer. –  raminr May 15 '13 at 22:12

You should put this in a java file and compile each one then see which one gives you the error. You don't have to reason about it to guess the answer.

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2  
I'm pretty sure all of them compile and run without errors. –  An Alien May 15 '13 at 21:00
1  
Yes, I tried it and they all compile. –  Scott Shipp May 15 '13 at 21:02
    
Then they're all acceptable. –  tieTYT May 15 '13 at 21:20

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