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I have 13255 images, each 240 x 240 pixels wide, the biggest 15,412 bytes in size and the smallest 839 bytes.

I am trying to loop through the folder adding each of them to a File[]. Once I have an array of each image I am then placing them inside a BufferedImage[] ready to be looped through and drawn onto a larger single image made up of each individual one.

Each image is named in the form of

Image x-y.png

However, I keep ending up with a java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space error. I have no idea why. I have tried altering the size of the memory available to the JVM by adding parameters to the end of the target for Eclipse. Below is what I have used:

IDE's\eclipse-jee-juno-SR2-win32-x86_64\eclipse\eclipse.exe -vmargs -Xms64m -Xmx1024m

and

IDE's\eclipse-jee-juno-SR2-win32-x86_64\eclipse\eclipse.exe -vmargs -Xms64m -Xmx4096m

Both have no effect. I have also gone into Control Panel -> Programs -> Java and changed the amount of memory available there.

Here is the method that I have written :

public static void merge_images() throws IOException {
        int rows = 115; 
        int cols = 115;
        int chunks = rows * cols;

        System.out.println(chunks);

        int chunkWidth, chunkHeight;
        int type;
        // fetching image files
        File[] imgFiles = new File[chunks];

        int count = 0;
        for (int j = 1; j <= 115; j++) {
            for (int k = 1; k <= 115; k++) {
                imgFiles[count] = new File("G:\\Images\\Image " + j
                        + "-" + k + ".png");
                count++;
            }
        }
        System.out.println(imgFiles.length);

        // creating a buffered image array from image files
        BufferedImage[] buffImages = new BufferedImage[chunks];
        for (int i = 0; i < chunks; i++) {
            buffImages[i] = ImageIO.read(imgFiles[i]);
            System.out.println(i);
        }
        type = buffImages[0].getType();
        chunkWidth = buffImages[0].getWidth();
        chunkHeight = buffImages[0].getHeight();

        // Initializing the final image
        BufferedImage finalImg = new BufferedImage(chunkWidth * cols,
                chunkHeight * rows, type);

        int num = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
            for (int k = 0; k < cols; k++) {
                finalImg.createGraphics().drawImage(buffImages[num], null,
                        chunkWidth * k, chunkHeight * i);
                num++;
            }
        }
        System.out.println("Image concatenated.....");
        ImageIO.write(finalImg, "png", new File("fusions.png"));
        System.out.println("Image Saved, Exiting");
    }

At the print line here

for (int i = 0; i < chunks; i++) {
            buffImages[i] = ImageIO.read(imgFiles[i]);
            System.out.println(i);
}

it always stops at around the 7320 point.

Here is the exact console print out

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space
    at java.awt.image.DataBufferByte.<init>(Unknown Source)
    at java.awt.image.ComponentSampleModel.createDataBuffer(Unknown Source)
    at java.awt.image.Raster.createWritableRaster(Unknown Source)
    at javax.imageio.ImageTypeSpecifier.createBufferedImage(Unknown Source)
    at javax.imageio.ImageReader.getDestination(Unknown Source)
    at com.sun.imageio.plugins.png.PNGImageReader.readImage(Unknown Source)
    at com.sun.imageio.plugins.png.PNGImageReader.read(Unknown Source)
    at javax.imageio.ImageIO.read(Unknown Source)
    at javax.imageio.ImageIO.read(Unknown Source)
    at main.merge_images(main.java:48)
    at main.main(main.java:19)

Any ideas where I am going wrong would be greatly appreciated.

Regards,

Jamie

share|improve this question
    
Have you put a break-point there somewhere and actually checked how much memory the program uses right before it would throw the exception? I would guess that loading an image into memory takes a lot more memory than how much it takes to store it, so it's not unlikely that you're actually running out of memory, as the exception suggests. –  Dukeling May 15 '13 at 21:01
    
I did step through coincidently, and it fell apart much earlier. As my solution shows it was most likely due to having so many images duplicated in arrays in the program. –  Jamie May 15 '13 at 21:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't need to keep all your chunk images in memory. You can read them one by one and draw to your final image in final loop like this:

for (int i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
    for (int k = 0; k < cols; k++) {
        BufferedImage buffImage = ImageIO.read(imgFiles[num]);
        finalImg.createGraphics().drawImage(buffImage, null,
                chunkWidth * k, chunkHeight * i);
        num++;
    }
}

This will save at least half of the memory.

share|improve this answer

You need to increase the maximum memory for your program, not the maximum of eclipse which doesn't need more memory I assume.

There is an option in eclipse for changing the VM arguments (I don't know that it is as I haven't used it for many years)

All the same you need to be able to load all the images uncompressed. This means you need at least 13225 * 240 * 240 * 4 bytes. This is just over 3 GB. If you load all the images first, you need at least double this. I suggest you make the heap at least 4 - 8 GB.

share|improve this answer

Look like everyone is offering a simpler and less resource consuming solution. Let me try mine:

public static void merge_images() throws IOException {
    int rows = 115; 
    int cols = 115;

    System.out.println(rows * cols);

    // Initializing the final image
    BufferedImage finalImg = null;
    for (int i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
        for (int k = 0; k < cols; k++) {
            BufferedImage bufferedImage = ImageIO.read(new File("G:\\Images\\Image " + i + "-" + k + ".png"));
            int chunkWidth = bufferedImage.getWidth();
            int chunkHeight = bufferedImage.getHeight();
            if (finalImg == null) {
                finalImg = new BufferedImage(chunkWidth * cols, chunkHeight * rows, bufferedImage.getType());
            }
            finalImg.createGraphics().drawImage(bufferedImage, null, chunkWidth * k, chunkHeight * i);
        }
    }

    System.out.println("Image concatenated.....");
    ImageIO.write(finalImg, "png", new File("fusions.png"));
    System.out.println("Image Saved, Exiting");
}
share|improve this answer

Try to run JVM with -Xmx1024m or the same with greater values. This value is the Heap size.

java -Xmx1024m -jar app.jar

Also, you can increase this value in your IDE.

share|improve this answer

As was pointed out by hoaz (Many thanks) I was taking too many steps than were necessary. My solution is as follows:

public static void merge_images() throws IOException {
        int rows = 115; // we assume the no. of rows and cols are known and each
                        // chunk has equal width and height
        int cols = 115;
        int chunks = rows * cols;

        System.out.println(chunks);

        // fetching image files
        File[] imgFiles = new File[chunks];

        int count = 0;
        for (int j = 1; j <= 115; j++) {
            for (int k = 1; k <= 115; k++) {
                imgFiles[count] = new File("G:\\Images\\Image " + j
                        + "-" + k + ".png");
                count++;
            }
        }

        // Initializing the final image
        BufferedImage finalImg = new BufferedImage(240 * cols,
                240 * rows, 13);

        int num = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
            for (int k = 0; k < cols; k++) {
                BufferedImage buffImage = ImageIO.read(imgFiles[num]);
                finalImg.createGraphics().drawImage(buffImage, null,
                        240 * k, 240 * i);
                num++;
            }
        }
        System.out.println("Image concatenated.....");
        ImageIO.write(finalImg, "png", new File("fusions.png"));
        System.out.println("Image Saved, Exiting");
    }

Essentially what I have done is remove the BufferedImage[] and instead created a new BufferedImage during the nested for loop when I am building up the final image. Rather than using variables I have hard coded the bounds of the images and type of each image.

Thanks for pointing me in the right direction hoaz.

Regards

Jamie

share|improve this answer

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