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I'm using Collabnet SVN client versions 1.5 & 1.6. My local machine is running Windows Vista x64 (I know, very sad indeed). I would like to force authentication every time I try to perform any subversion operations on a selected repository. How might I set a property or setting to require authentication every time? Thanks for the help and suggestions!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You have 2 Solutions:

  1. use the --no-auth-cache switch on all of your commands

  2. edit the Subverison config file (%APPDATA%\Subversion\config )and look for commented line:

# store-passwords = no

and remove the "#" at start of the line. This will switch off Password caching permanently.

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Great handle btw (I'm a reader of Spiderman). If that's your real name even better. So I couldn't find the Subversion\config folder, but let's say I have a working copy that I want to apply --no-auth-cache to all .svn directories recursively. Would you know how to accomplish this. I marked this as answered, b/c I'm clearly missing something that everyone else seems to know as confirmed by their extremely similar answers LOL. –  mkelley33 Nov 1 '09 at 16:59
3  
config is a file not a folder; on Vista it should be at C:\Users\mkelley\AppData\Roaming\Subversion\config. Don't forget to clear the cache files first; otherwise, if your password has already been cached, it will remain cached even if you set store-passwords = no. And --no-auth-cache is not a property of a folder, but rather an option that you pass when you execute a command. If you set store-passwords = no, you won't need it. –  Michael Hackner Nov 1 '09 at 17:09
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also check for a .subversion folder in %USERPROFILE%, and my config file on Win 7 is at %APPDATA%\Roaming\Subversion\conig –  Jim Deville Nov 1 '09 at 17:11
    
Thanks (Michael and James) for the clarification, and of course my web-slinging answer-provider (Peter Parker) for providing a great answer. –  mkelley33 Nov 1 '09 at 17:19

You want the --no-auth-cache option.

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