Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I m novice and i am learning data structures in haskell right now.I saw something like

  Tree(Int,Int)

Does that mean tuple of trees? i m trying to write something like

  data Tree a = Leaf a | Node (Tree a) a (Tree a) deriving (Eq,Show)

  weight :: (Tree Integer) -> Tree(Integer,Integer)

  weight (Node left leaf right) = Node (leaf, (sum left) + (sum right)) 
                          where 
                          sum (Leaf a) = 0
                          sum (Node left leaf right) = leaf + sum left + sum right

But i am getting couldn't match error.

What I want to get is the weight of each Node and return it as a tuple.And a single leaf doesnt have a weight

share|improve this question
1  
what about right part of Node? shouldn't it be Node (Leaf, (sum left) + (sum right), Leaf) or something like that? –  Elazar May 15 '13 at 23:16
2  
It means a tree of tuples, not a tuple of trees. (More specifically, it's a tree of pairs.) –  AndrewC May 15 '13 at 23:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To fix the immediate error, you need to provide three arguments to the Node constructor:

weight (Node left leaf right) = Node (weight left) 
                                     (leaf, (sum left) + (sum right)) 
                                     (weight right)
                          where 
                          sum (Leaf a) = 0
                          sum (Node left leaf right) = leaf + sum left + sum right

and perhaps a base case

weight (Leaf a) = Leaf (a,0)

..but I'm not sure this is what you intended:

ghci> weight (Node (Leaf 100) 10 (Node (Leaf 20) 30 (Leaf 40)))
Node (Leaf (100,0)) (10,30) (Node (Leaf (20,0)) (30,0) (Leaf (40,0)))

The values at the leaves are ignored and the second element in each pair is the subtree total.

Sum less frequently

There's a lot of repetition in summing the left and right subtrees, when you're calculating their weight too. Why not reuse the value?

We can read off the sum of a subtree by taking the second element of the top pair:

topsecond :: Tree (a,a) -> a
topsecond (Leaf (x,y)) = y
topsecond (Node _ (x,y) _) = y

So let's use that to get the sum

weigh (Leaf a) = Leaf (a,0)
weigh (Node left value right) = Node newleft (value,total) newright where
       newleft = weigh left
       newright = weigh right
       leftsum = topsecond newleft
       rightsum = topsecond newright
       total = leftsum + value + rightsum           

Add up differently

In a comment you mention we should have (10,190) for the node tagged 10. That's the sum of everything below, but not including the current item. This means that the total weight of a subtree can be obtained by adding its subtrees' weight to the current value:

addTopPair :: Num a => Tree (a,a) -> a  -- or Tree (Integer,Integer) -> Integer
addTopPair (Leaf (x,y)) = x+y
addTopPair (Node _ (x,y) _) = x+y

and then

weighUnder (Leaf a) = Leaf (a,0)
weighUnder (Node left value right) = Node newleft (value,total) newright where
       newleft = weighUnder left
       newright = weighUnder right
       leftsum = addTopPair newleft
       rightsum = addTopPair newright
       total = leftsum + rightsum           

giving

ghci> weighUnder (Node (Leaf 100) 10 (Node (Leaf 20) 30 (Leaf 40)))
Node (Leaf (100,0)) (10,190) (Node (Leaf (20,0)) (30,60) (Leaf (40,0)))

and

ghci> > weighUnder $ Node (Node (Leaf (-8)) (-12) (Node (Leaf 9) 3 (Leaf 6))) 5 (Node (Leaf 2) 14 (Leaf(-2)))
Node (Node (Leaf (-8,0)) (-12,10) (Node (Leaf (9,0)) (3,15) (Leaf (6,0)))) (5,12) (Node (Leaf (2,0)) (14,0) (Leaf (-2,0)))

as required.

share|improve this answer
    
not exactly.i think i expressed my self wrong. for example for 10 it should be (10,190) –  nbdip May 15 '13 at 23:29
    
@nbdip The sum of everything except the current value? –  AndrewC May 15 '13 at 23:35
    
yeah.for example ; tree=Node (Node (Leaf (-8)) (-12) (Node (Leaf 9) 3 (Leaf 6))) 5 (Node (Leaf 2) 14 (Leaf(-2))) and for weigh tree it should be (3,15),(-12,10),(5,12),(14,0) –  nbdip May 15 '13 at 23:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.