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I'm starting a single-page application and reviewing various templates and projects etc to decide on one as a starting point. I setup a new project using the default microsoft template and I see the mvc controllers, views, etc just as I expect for an mvc app.

Then I read about some new community templates and so I want to try those out too. I read a lot about "hot towel". First off, my Visual Studio refuses to show me the templates. I read lots of other people having this problem and with no fixes. So I have to manually install the HotTowel template off of John Papa's site. I generate a new starter project and run it. Looks nice. I start looking through the code, but now I'm scratching my head. What is this? There's no asp.net mvc in here at all except for the default controller with a single empty index action in it. There's not one single C# model. There's only one razor view for the main template! This looks like an application within an application. The major guts of this are even installed in yet another SUBDIRECTORY that has nothing to do with asp.net!!! Asp.net mvc is used to launch the first page, but after that, there's no more asp.net mvc anymore and it's just raw html and js. Feels more like asp.net mvc is getting in the way!

Am I missing something about this "HotTowel" template? Did I install an old version? What is so great about this template if it doesn't even really use asp.net?

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2 Answers 2

Welcome to the single page applications. This is the point of the approach - the server is only responsible for supplying data in json or xml format, usually through ajax. All UI related logic is done on the client using javascript.

By the way there is a number of client side frameworks to make the client side development easier. Knockout this template is based on is just one of them and not my personal favorite. I do all client side development using angular. It covers a lot more ground than knockout and the same functionality usually takes much less code.

Another interesting thing is that SPA done right allows to separate your development into 2 separate tracks - the client side and the server side. And you can do the development in parallel, in particular you can easily create your mock server using nodejs which would give you the necessary data without running IIS or dealing with the database.

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But the server still needs to serve up html for any partial views, tabs, sub screens, dialogs, etc. HotTowel has those html pages that are served up that get loaded for home, detail, etc and I was expecting those to be asp.net mvc such that I would use C#, razor, htmlhelpers, etc to build my views. I understand once that part of the page is loaded, then the browser is using ajax to fetch data updates. But there's not even an example of that within this template. Since this claims to be an asp.net mvc single-page template, I was expecting to at least see one web api call, but there's nothing! –  happyfirst May 15 '13 at 23:44
    
well, static html can be served directly by the server and the server does not have to be IIS or Cassini. nodejs would do just fine. ASP.NET is still an important part of the picture, but in this model it is limited to supplying just data - no html. The way we do development is that all client side development is done with nodejs express as a server - it is extremely lightweight and easy to configure, and then the client side code is just replanted to work over the real data side –  mfeingold May 16 '13 at 0:27

You probably need to look at Fluent Knockout Helpers https://github.com/johnculviner/FluentKnockoutHelpers

It generates Knockout code with strongly typed razor view code, validation through Data Annotations and much more. It's an excellent example for DurandalJS, Knockout and ASP.net MVC.

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