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I'm trying to have a one-liner LINQ statement to project my one object to my ViewModel object - it seems it won't work with select?? The compiler says cannot resolve symbol select. This works with a collection, why doesn't it here? If not select, what keyword am I missing?

return from p in SettingRepository.Get(id)
       select new EditSetting
                {

                };

Edit - Scratch that, doesn't work for a list. How can I accomplish this?

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What do you mean it doesn't work for a list? What you have will work perfectly fine for a list. –  Phill May 16 '13 at 2:05
1  
What's the return type of SettingRepository.Get()? –  Sina Iravanian May 16 '13 at 2:08
    
@SinaIravanian it is an Entity Framework object. –  Doctor Oreo May 16 '13 at 2:09
2  
if SettingRepository.Get() returns EntityObject, surely it wont work. Select() is available for collections like IEnumerable<T>, IQueryable<T>, IObjectSet<T> etc –  mshsayem May 16 '13 at 2:19
    
Yes it is one EntityObject. Is there a way to do this without Select? –  Doctor Oreo May 19 '13 at 17:29

2 Answers 2

Although I'm not sure why you would want to use select to do this, but if you're really adamant about it:

return from p in new List<EntityObject>{SettingRepository.Get(id)}
       select new EditSetting
                {

                };

If not, why not just use good old initializers?

var editSetting= new EditSetting { Id = setting.Id };
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1  
agreed. However Bryan has neglected to go over the reasons this is bad. Typically I see a lot of tight looping of code on .Get(id) which when used on EF means O(n) database IO hits, severely impacting performance. –  Aron May 16 '13 at 4:43
    
thanks Aron for clearing it up. –  Bryan Hong May 16 '13 at 5:08

Typically I prefer to create methods with the following pattern. It discourages tight looping of Database calls, which can severely limit performance. Still Bryan Hong's answer is the actual ANSWER to your question.

public IQueryable<EditSetting> GetEditSettings()
{
    return from p in SettingRepository
        select new EditSetting{
                Foo = p.Foo,
                Bar = p.Bar,
                //etc...
        };
}

or

public IEnumerable<EditSetting> GetEditSettingsById(IList<string> ids)
{
    var ret =  from p in SettingRepository
            where ids.Contains(p.Id)
            select new EditSetting{
                    Foo = p.Foo,
                    Bar = p.Bar,
                    //etc...
            };
    return ret.ToList();
}
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