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To provide a TRIAL period to my application when the user first runs the application I save the FirstRunTime like this:

string sFirstRunDate = DateTime.Today.ToShortDateString();
saveInfo.saveFirstRun(sFirstRunDate );  // saves as a string to a text file

Now everytime I run the application I want to see if it has been more then 60 days and if so terminate (60-day trial only). How can I do that compare?

string sFirstRunDate = saveInfo.getFirstRun();   // returns the string I saved earlier
DateTime dtFirstRunDate = DateTime.Parse(sFirstRunDate);  // makes it a DateTime
DateTime now = DateTime.Today.ToShortDateString();   // why am I doing this?

So how can I take the two dates and compare them to see if it has been more then 60 days or not? Thanks,

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4 Answers 4

The following should do it:

var elapsed = DateTime.Today.Subtract(dtFirstRunDate);
if (elapsed.TotalDays > 60)
{
    // trial expired
}

The advantage of this is when the trial hasn't expired you can tell them how far they are into their trial (using elapsed.TotalDays).

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    TimeSpan t = DateTime.Now.Subtract(dtFirstRunDate);
    if (t.Days > 60)
    {
        //do something
    }
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1  
Your // do something block will run if the trial hasn't expired yet. Your testing to see if the trial date is greater than the current time. –  Steven V May 16 '13 at 2:53
    
my //do something block will run if the trial has expired. –  Vond Ritz May 16 '13 at 2:56
1  
What your saying is... if dtFirstRun is 2013-05-15 then add 60 days , it becomes 2013-07-15. Then DateTime.Now is 2013-05-15. if(2013-07-15 > 2013-05-15) will evaluate as true when the trial has not expired. –  Steven V May 16 '13 at 2:59
    
ok i edited my answer. take a look at it. :) –  Vond Ritz May 16 '13 at 3:03
    
thanks @StevenVondruska vondruska. we have 'vond' in our name. hehehe :) –  Vond Ritz May 16 '13 at 3:18

Try

if(DateTime.Parse(sFirstRunDate).AddDays(60) < DateTime.Now) {
    // trial has expired
}

This just takes the first run, adds 60 days to it, if the current time is greater than the time first run + 60 days, the trial is over.

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All other answers are technically going to work for you, but they are wrong on a larger scale. Please read further.

// why am I doing this?

This tells me that you do not quite grasp the concepts you're trying to apply. Let's go one by one.

string sFirstRunDate = DateTime.Today.ToShortDateString();

There are two problems with that. First the DateTime.Today returns the local date/time. Never ever use local date/time for any kind of calculations because local time is not consistent. Daylight changes, travel through time zones, all affect the local time that is returned by this property. What you should use instead is DateTime.UtcNow.Date to get the current UTC time which is the global clock not affected by any of the aforementioned problems.

Second problem is the ToShortDateString method. It converts the date/time using current culture. Did you know that in other parts of the world, the date is reported as 'DD/MM/YYYY', or 'YYYY-MM-DD'? What will happen if the user changes current locale? To avoid those problems you should use the ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture) method.

The correct code to serialize the first run date is

string sFirstRunDate = DateTime.UtcNow.Date.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);

DateTime now = DateTime.Today.ToShortDateString(); // why am I doing this?

To calculate the difference between two dates, first you need to acquire those two dates. The first one would be the saved first run date, and the second would be today. You did the first part by deserializing the first run date into DateTime structure. For the second part you just need the current date, you don't need to serialize it into string. So

DateTime today = DateTime.UtcNow.Date;

Now that you have two dates, you have an array of options on how to actually get the difference. Any of the other answers do that part just fine. I personally like Timothy Walters' answer as it has a nice side effect of giving your the days left for trial. It will look like:

DateTime dtFirstRunDate = DateTime.Parse(saveInfo.getFirstRun());
DateTime today = DateTime.UtcNow.Date;
var elapsed = today.Subtract(dtFirstRunDate);
if (elapsed.TotalDays > 60)
{
    // trial expired
}
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