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I want to be able to make the compiler shout when i call a constructor of foo with a class that is NOT derived from base. The current code allows only for foo<base> itself. Any easy solution ?

class _base
{
public:
    // ...
};

class _derived: public _base
{
public:
    // ...
};

template <typename T>
class foo
{
public:
    foo ()		{ void TEMPLATE_ERROR; }
};

template <> foo<_base*>::foo () 
{
    // this is the only constructor
}

main-code:

foo<_base*>    a;    // should work 
foo<_derived*> b;    // should work (but doesnt)
foo<int*>      c;    // should not work (and infact doesnt)
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Without Boost you can use something like the following to determine whether a pointer-to-type can be implicitly cast to another pointer-to-type:

template <class Derived, class Base>
struct IsConvertible
{
    template <class T>
    static char test(T*);

    template <class T>
    static double test(...);

    static const bool value = sizeof(test<Base>(static_cast<Derived*>(0))) == 1;
};

To make it trigger an error at compile-time, you can now use value in an expression that causes an error if it is false, for example typedef a negative-sized array.

template <typename T>
class foo
{
public:
    foo ()
    {
        typedef T assert_at_compile_time[IsConvertible<T, _base>::value ? 1 : -1];
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
aaah, thank you. i tried to figure that out by myself diving into the boost-djungle, but i stumbled about alot of code-tangleweed so i had to retreat. But this is, exactly what i'm searching for, thank you. – Roman Pfneudl Nov 2 '09 at 8:28
1  
I recommend you reading "Modern C++ Design: Generic Programming and Design Patterns Applied" by Andrei Alexandrescu if you want to learn more Template-related techniques like this one. – Julien-L Nov 2 '09 at 14:59
    
+1 That's a really good one. And thanks for the book recommendation! – Diego Sevilla Nov 3 '09 at 0:30

Use SFINAE (via enable_if) and Boost’s is_convertible type trait:

template <typename T, typename Enabled = void>
class foo
{
private:
    foo(); // Constructor declared private and not implemented.
};

template <typename T>
class foo<T, typename enable_if<is_convertible<T, _base*> >::type>
{
public:
    foo() { /* regular code */ }
};

(untested, haven’t got Boost installed on this machine.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanx, i read through the links and they triggered some thoughts. Should be a good solution, but im not using boost so far. – Roman Pfneudl Nov 1 '09 at 18:33
    
The beauty of Boost is that you can use only parts of it – in particular, most headers can just be copy-pasted in either your project’s directory or a system include directory. – Konrad Rudolph Nov 1 '09 at 21:10

I understand that you are not using boost in your project, but maybe you could copy-paste some parts of it.

I found a simpler solution to your problem using boost:

template <typename T>
class foo
{
public:
    foo () {
        BOOST_STATIC_ASSERT((boost::is_convertible<T,_base*>::value));
    }
};

It doesn't require additional template parameter, also no need for template specialization. I tested it with boost 1.40.

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