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I want to handle the special case where multiplying two numbers together causes an overflow. The code looks something like this:

int a = 20;
long b = 30;

// if a or b are big enough, this result will silently overflow
long c = a * b;

That's a simplified version - in the real app, a and b are sourced elsewhere at runtime. What I want to achieve is something like this:

long c;
if (a * b will overflow) {
    c = Long.MAX_VALUE;
} else {
    c = a * b;
}

How do you suggest I best code this?

Update: a and b are always non-negative in my scenario.

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So many good - and seemingly correct - answers... I don't know which one to mark as "answered"! –  Steve McLeod Nov 2 '09 at 11:39
    
It's too bad that Java doesn't provide indirect access to the CPU's overflow flag, as is done in C#. –  Drew Noakes Aug 20 '12 at 20:29

10 Answers 10

up vote 28 down vote accepted

If a and b are both positive then you can use:

if (a != 0 && b > Long.MAX_VALUE / a) {
    // Overflow
}

If you need to deal with both positive and negative numbers then it's more complicated:

long maximum = Long.signum(a) == Long.signum(b) ? Long.MAX_VALUE : Long.MIN_VALUE;

if (a != 0 && (b > 0 && b > maximum / a ||
               b < 0 && b < maximum / a))
{
    // Overflow
}

Here's a little table I whipped up to check this, pretending that overflow happens at -10 or +10:

a =  5   b =  2     2 >  10 /  5
a =  2   b =  5     5 >  10 /  2
a = -5   b =  2     2 > -10 / -5
a = -2   b =  5     5 > -10 / -2
a =  5   b = -2    -2 < -10 /  5
a =  2   b = -5    -5 < -10 /  2
a = -5   b = -2    -2 <  10 / -5
a = -2   b = -5    -5 <  10 / -2
share|improve this answer
    
I should mention that a and b are always non-negative in my scenario, which would simplify this approach somewhat. –  Steve McLeod Nov 1 '09 at 18:17
    
doesn't compile in java. Also a tidge slower than my answer :) –  rogerdpack Jun 1 '11 at 0:39
    
@rogerdpack Which begs the question of how you were able to measure the performance of something you couldn't even compile... –  b1nary.atr0phy Mar 31 at 0:05
    
Yeah I modified it locally at the time IIRC (the answer has since been modified to be compilable, same way, FWIW). –  rogerdpack Apr 1 at 16:39

You could use java.math.BigInteger instead and check the size of the result (haven't tested the code):

BigInteger bigC = BigInteger.valueOf(a) * multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(b));
if(bigC.compareTo(BigInteger.valueOf(Long.MAX_VALUE)) > 0) {
  c = Long.MAX_VALUE;
} else {
  c = bigC.longValue()
}
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4  
i find this solution rather slow –  Yossarian Nov 1 '09 at 18:14
    
It's probably the best way to do it, though. I assumed this was a numerical application, which is why I didn't recommend it offhand, but this really is probably the best way to solve this problem. –  Stefan Kendall Nov 1 '09 at 18:15
2  
I'm not sure you can use the '>' operator with BigInteger. the compareTo method should be used. –  Pierre Nov 1 '09 at 18:16
    
changed to compareTo, and speed might matter or might not, depends on the circumstances where the code will be used. –  Ulf Lindback Nov 1 '09 at 18:21

Use logarithms to check the size of the result.

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do you mean: ceil(log(a)) + ceil(log(b)) > log(Long.MAX)? –  Thomas Jung Nov 1 '09 at 18:16
    
Yeah, something like that. –  High Performance Mark Nov 1 '09 at 18:21
1  
Heh, interesting answer given your username. ;-) –  John Kugelman Nov 1 '09 at 18:43
    
That's right. But maybe it is faster than BigInteger. –  Thomas Jung Nov 1 '09 at 18:47
1  
I checked it. For small values it is 20% faster than BigInteger and for values near MAX it is nearly the same (5% faster). Yossarian's code is the fastest (95% & 75% faster than BigInteger). –  Thomas Jung Nov 1 '09 at 19:09

Does Java has something like int.MaxValue? If yes, then try

if (b != 0 && Math.abs(a) > Math.abs(Long.MAX_VALUE / b))
{
 // it will overflow
}

edit: seen Long.MAX_VALUE in question

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I didn't downvote but Math.Abs(a) doesn't work if a is Long.MIN_VALUE. –  John Kugelman Nov 1 '09 at 18:31
    
@John - a and b are > 0. I think Yossarian's approach (b != 0 && a > Long.MAX_VALUE / b) is the best. –  Thomas Jung Nov 1 '09 at 18:44
    
@Thomas, a and b are >= 0, that is, non-negative. –  Steve McLeod Nov 1 '09 at 18:50
1  
Right, but in that case no need for the Abs's. If negative numbers are allowed then this fails for at least one edge case. That's all I'm saying, just being nitpicky. –  John Kugelman Nov 1 '09 at 18:59
    
in Java you must use Math.abs, not Math.Abs (C# guy?) –  dfa Nov 1 '09 at 22:07

There are Java libraries that provide safe arithmetic operations, which check long overflow/underflow. For example, Guava's LongMath.checkedMultiply(int a, int b) returns the product of a and b, provided it does not overflow, and throws ArithmeticException if a * b overflows in signed long arithmetic.

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1  
This is the best answer -- use a library which was implemented by people who really understand machine arithmetic in Java and which has been tested by lots of people. Don't attempt to write your own or use any of the half-baked untested code posted in the other answers! –  Rich Jan 21 at 11:22

I am not sure why nobody is looking at solution like:

if (Long.MAX_VALUE/a > b) {
     // overflows
} 

Choose a to be larger of the two numbers.

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Stolen from jruby

    long result = a * b;
    if (a != 0 && result / a != b) {
       // overflow
    }

UPDATE: This code is short and works well; however, it fails for a = -1, b = Long.MIN_VALUE.

One possible enhancement:

long result = a * b;
if( (Math.signum(a) * Math.signum(b) != Math.signum(result)) || 
    (a != 0L && result / a != b)) {
    // overflow
}

Note that this will catch some overflows without any division.

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You can use Long.signum instead of Math.signum –  aditsu Apr 6 at 5:36

maybe this will help you:

/**
 * @throws ArithmeticException on integer overflow
 */
static long multiply(long a, long b) {
    double c = (double) a * b;
    long d = a * b;

    if ((long) c != d) {
        throw new ArithmeticException("int overflow");
    } else {
        return d;
    }
}
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Wont help as one of the operands is long. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Nov 1 '09 at 23:50
    
fixed, thanks very much –  dfa Nov 2 '09 at 8:49
    
Did you even test this? For any large but not overflowing values of a & b this will fail due to rounding errors in the double version of the multiply (try e.g. 123456789123L and 74709314L). If you don't understand machine arithmetic, guessing an answer to this kind of precise question is worse than not answering, as it will mislead people. –  Rich Jan 21 at 11:13

Maybe:

if(b!= 0 && a * b / b != a) //overflow

Not sure about this "solution".

Edit: Added b != 0.

Before you downvote: a * b / b won't be optimized. This would be compiler bug. I do still not see a case where the overflow bug can be masked.

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Fails on b = 0. –  Stefan Kendall Nov 1 '09 at 18:16
    
Also fails when overflow causes a perfect loop. –  Stefan Kendall Nov 1 '09 at 18:17
    
Do you have an example of what you meant? –  Thomas Jung Nov 1 '09 at 18:29
    
Just wrote a little test: Using BigInteger is 6 times slower than using this division approach. So I assume additional checks for corner cases is worth it performance-wise. –  mhaller Nov 1 '09 at 18:36
    
Don't know much about java compilers, but an expression like a * b / b is likely to be optimized to just a in many other contexts. –  IfLoop Nov 1 '09 at 22:09

c / c ++ (long * long):

const int64_ w = (int64_) a * (int64_) b;    
if ((long) (w >> sizeof(long) * 8) != (long) w >> (sizeof(long) * 8 - 1))
    // overflow

java (int * int, sorry I didn't find int64 in java):

const long w = (long) a * (long) b;    
int bits = 32; // int is 32bits in java    
if ( (int) (w >> bits) != (int) (w >> (bits - 1))) {
   // overflow
}

1.save the result in large type (int*int put the result to long, long*long put to int64)

2.cmp result >> bits and result >> (bits - 1)

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2  
This isn't going to work in Java. –  Ted Hopp Dec 5 '12 at 2:54
    
sorry, I take a mistake....update ! –  xuan Dec 5 '12 at 3:56

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