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I can never find a clear answer for this use case, I apologize if this is a duplicate. In the following example, Is there a clean way to test with rspec that the method in class B gets called?

module A
  def demo_method
    puts 1
  end
end

class B
  extend A
  demo_method
end
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Think about if you care that the method in class B gets called (specificity) or if you care about the behavior or result. As long as 1 is output and the method returns nil, then it doesn't really matter if it was part of class B or derived from module A, does it? –  vgoff May 16 '13 at 4:35
    
My real life example is that in a rails model, I want to make sure that these methods are called. It's important that they do get called and that there is some kind of test support for them. Do you have any advice for this? –  ericraio May 16 '13 at 5:33
    
Maybe you should simply test the expected behavior of the class. Presumably your method does something, so you should test for that something. Testing that "a method got called" gets too deep into the implementation details, IMO. –  davogones May 16 '13 at 5:38
    
@davogones How is it different then an rspec matcher "it { should validate_presence_of(:name) }" –  ericraio May 16 '13 at 5:53
2  
Validating that a certain attribute is present is a behavior of your class that would be important to have in the spec. What you're describing (a certain method should be called when the class is defined) sounds more like internal workings of the class that aren't important for consumers to know about. So I'm suggesting that you test for the expected results of the method (public behavior), rather than testing that the method is called (private implementation details). –  davogones May 16 '13 at 6:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

At first revise your method name method into demo_method as that name is sensitive.

Then

B.should respond_to :demo_method
# => true
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The problem with this is that, it doesn't actually test the method being called, this just tests that the method is defined in the module. –  ericraio May 16 '13 at 5:26
    
@ericraio, maybe you can use B.should 'see something like puts 1', the called method("Class Macro") will be execute immidietly once the class is defined or called. –  Billy Chan May 16 '13 at 5:53

If you really really need to know that class B is calling a method, you can use the caller method. It will show you the stack.

You will get this type of stack output:

$: ruby
how-do-you-test-a-class-with-an-extended-module-in-ruby-with-spec.rb 
how-do-you-test-a-class-with-an-extended-module-in-ruby-with-spec.rb:10:in
`<class:B>'
how-do-you-test-a-class-with-an-extended-module-in-ruby-with-spec.rb:8:in `<main>' 1
how-do-you-test-a-class-with-an-extended-module-in-ruby-with-spec.rb:14:in
`<main>' 1

You just need to output the caller

module A
  def demo_method
    puts caller
    puts 1
  end
end

class B
  extend A
  demo_method
end

puts B::demo_method

This information may be better served as morsel in logs at debug level, rather than on the screen. But I hope that helps.

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