Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to find difference between 2 Date in months and days using Java. For example: difference between 5/16/2013 and 7/20/2013 is 2 months and 4 days.

Thank you for your consideration on this matter.

share|improve this question
3  
The short answer is use JodaTime - it deals with things like leap years, seconds and all that fun stuff –  MadProgrammer May 16 '13 at 4:17
    
possible duplicate of Calculating the Difference Between Two Java Date Instances –  CoolBeans May 16 '13 at 4:39
1  
See this answer for a solution using Joda Time. –  Katja Christiansen May 16 '13 at 11:57

4 Answers 4

Use joda time library as its better to handle dates http://joda-time.sourceforge.net/

Something like this Days.daysBetween(first DateTime, second DateTime).getDays();

share|improve this answer

I would do it like this

    Calendar c1 = new GregorianCalendar(2012, 0, 1);
    Calendar c2 = new GregorianCalendar(2013, 0, 2);
    int monthDiff = (c2.get(Calendar.YEAR) - c1.get(Calendar.YEAR)) * 12 + c2.get(Calendar.MONTH) - c1.get(Calendar.MONTH);
    int dayDiff;
    if (c1.get(Calendar.DATE) < c2.get(Calendar.DATE)) {
        monthDiff--;
        dayDiff = c1.getActualMaximum(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH) - c1.get(Calendar.DATE) + c2.get(Calendar.DATE); 
    } else {
        dayDiff = c2.get(Calendar.DATE) - c1.get(Calendar.DATE);
    }
    System.out.println(monthDiff + " " + dayDiff);
share|improve this answer
1  
Over short distances and same time zones, this is okay, but it begins to suffer when you expand the range and start dealing with things like leap years and seconds, century cross overs just to mention a few –  MadProgrammer May 16 '13 at 4:32

Try this one

     java.text.DateFormat df = new java.text.SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss");
    java.util.Date date1 = df.parse("2012-09-30 15:26:14+00");
    java.util.Date date2 = df.parse("2012-08-30 15:26:14+00");
    int diff = getMonthDifference(date1, date2);
    System.out.println(diff);


    public static int getMonthDifference(java.util.Date date1, java.util.Date date2) {
        if (date1.after(date2)) {
            return getMonthDifference0(date1, date2);
        } else if (date2.after(date1)) {
            return -getMonthDifference0(date2, date1);
        }
        return 0;
    }

private static int getMonthDifference0(java.util.Date date1, java.util.Date date2) {
        Calendar c1 = Calendar.getInstance();
        Calendar c2 = Calendar.getInstance();
        c1.setTime(date1);
        c2.setTime(date2);
        int diff = 0;
        while (c2.getTimeInMillis() < c1.getTimeInMillis()) {
            c2.add(Calendar.MONTH, 1);
            diff++;
        }
        int dd = c2.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH) - c1.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH);
        if (dd > 0) {
            diff--;
        } else if (dd == 0) {
            int hd = c2.get(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY) - c1.get(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY);
            if (hd > 0) {
                diff++;
            } else if (hd == 0) {
                long t1 = c1.getTimeInMillis() % (60 * 1000);
                long t2 = c2.getTimeInMillis() % (60 * 1000);
                if (t2 > t1) {
                    diff--;
                }
            }
        }
        return diff;
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
I've used this approach in the past and though it was good but it has a problem when dealing with DST and Standard dates e.g. Try getting the number of days between 2013-03-09 and 2013-03-12 on GMT -6. –  Luiggi Mendoza May 16 '13 at 4:19

Nobody said console.log( new Date("2013-09-30") - new Date("2012-01-01") ); It will give you difference in milliseconds. Its up to you to handle time zones and so forth when creating those 2 objects.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.