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I'm trying to split a string without removing the delimiter and having trouble doing so. The string I want to split is:

'+ {- 9 4} {+ 3 2}'

and I want to end up with

['+', '{- 9 4}', '{+ 3 2}']

yet everything I've tried hasn't worked. I was looking through this stackoverflow post for answers as well as google: Python split() without removing the delimiter

Thanks!

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Are the values between curly braces always numbers? –  Jared May 16 '13 at 4:30
    
no, alphanumeric –  BooBailey May 16 '13 at 4:30
1  
Can you have nested curly braces, eg: '+ {+ 5 {- 7 2}} {+ 3 2}'? If so, what do you expect to see in your split? This looks to me like you're trying to write a prefix-notation arithmetic expression parser. –  Peter DeGlopper May 16 '13 at 4:33
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You might find this discussion useful: stackoverflow.com/questions/5307218/… - and, yeah, recursive parsing is the right general approach. –  Peter DeGlopper May 16 '13 at 4:43
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If I remember my theory correctly, it's impossible to get regexps to correctly count nesting levels of things like your curly braces - you may have to parse character by character keeping track of the stack depth yourself, or use a parser generator: stackoverflow.com/questions/133601/… –  Peter DeGlopper May 16 '13 at 4:56

1 Answer 1

re.split will keep the delimiters when they are captured, i.e., enclosed in parentheses:

import re
s = '+ {- 9 4} {+ 3 2}'
p = filter(lambda x: x.strip() != '', re.split("([+{} -])", s)) 

will give you

['+', '{', '-', '9', '4', '}', '{', '+', '3', '2', '}']

which, IMO, is what you need to handle nested expressions

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The entire regex must itself be enclosed in parentheses, so e.g. r'((\+|-)+)'. Otherwise you only capture a subgroup. –  smci Jun 18 '13 at 23:20

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