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Looking to see if anyone knows if its possible to swap C functions...?

 void swap2(int(*a)(int), int(*b)(int)) {
   int(*temp)(int) = a;
   *a = *b;
   *b = temp;
   // Gives 'Non-object type 'int (int)' is not assignable
 }

 swap2(&funcA, &funcB);

EDIT

More data here as to intention -- Some answers have been provided below which do work such as creating the function ptr using typedef, pointing them to the functions and switching those, which lets you invoke the new swapped ptrs successfully.

BUT calling the functions by their original names after swapping shows no change. Essentially I'm looking for a c equivalent of the objc "swizzle".

I'm beginning to think this isn't possible, due to c's complete lack of reflection, and would require actually modifying the binary itself (obviously not feasible). D:

Comments welcome.

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1  
*b in *b=temp is totally absurd.You can dereference a function pointer only to invoke it. –  Thokchom May 16 '13 at 6:03
    
*b is not a valid lvalue to begin with. –  Thokchom May 16 '13 at 6:31
    
@Thokchom -- While that comment appears to be mostly critical rather than constructive, the point remains that you are correct. That function was an adaptation of a generic pointer swap intended for other data types and obviously incorrect, hence my question here in the first place ** See edit ** –  Miles Alden May 16 '13 at 18:06
    
No,no, you are misunderstanding me.Why should I be critical of you?I was only talking about that assignment.I wrote "absurd" in bold to draw your attention to that only.Cheers!! –  Thokchom May 16 '13 at 20:02
    
@MilesAlden About EDIT part: being able to swap functions at runtime requires runtime decision about which function to call. Some languages may have syntactic sugar about it, but it always boils down to some kind of lookup at what to call (or modification of binary at every place where the function is called, which often is even forbidden by the OS). In C, if you want to have this, you need to do it explicitly, and function pointer is the most straightforward way (but not the only one). IOW, in C, you have to implement reflection features yourself, where you need them. –  hyde May 19 '13 at 16:28
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5 Answers

If you use the function pointers like below, it is yes

typedef int (*func_pt)(int);

func_pt a, b;

void swap(func_pt * a, func_pt * b)
{
    func_pt tmp = *b;
    *b = *a;
    *a = tmp;
}

swap(&a, &b);

Or you use it as this, I think it is no:

int test1(int a)
{
    return a;
}

int test2(int b)
{
    return b;
}

swap(&test1, &test2);

Complete compiling working program

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef int (* func_pt)(int);

func_pt a, b;

int test1(int a)
{
    printf("test1\n");
    return 1;
}

int test2(int a)
{
    printf("test2\n");
    return 2;
}

void swap(func_pt * a, func_pt * b)
{
    func_pt tmp = *b;

    *b = *a;
    *a = tmp;
}

int main(void)
{
    a = &test1;
    b = &test2;

    printf("before\n");
    a(1);
    b(1);

    swap(&a, &b);

    printf("after\n");
    a(1);
    b(2);

    return 0;

}

Output:

before
test1
test2
after
test2
test1

Some people do not try it by themselves, just say it absurd.So I give you a example.

share|improve this answer
    
This does work as you describe making it possible to swap the typedef'd ptrs, and if you call those they are flipped; however I'm more interested in the 2nd example. I'm essentially looking for the equivalent of swizzling in objective-c for regular c functions. Here we're invoking these pointers, but if I call test1(1), it still calls test1() instead of test2(). Any ideas there? –  Miles Alden May 16 '13 at 17:21
    
@MilesAlden: Function names are "address constants". Standard C won't let you change them, and is allowed to set your computer on fire if you if you somehow managed to. If you want to switch out implementations at will, you'd have to have function pointers representing each of them, and always call the functions through those pointers. That effectively kills many forms of optimization, though. –  cHao May 16 '13 at 18:39
    
"...allowed to set your computer on fire..." Just literally laughed out loud at that one, thanks. :-) Ya that's what I was gleaning here. –  Miles Alden May 16 '13 at 19:05
    
@cHao As fun as it is to say how UB allows compiler to set your compiler on fire, it's so inaccurate it's getting old. Actually it just doesn't forbid compiler from doing so, but C standard does not have the authority to allow that even if it wanted. Standard is not the only thing compiler has to adhere to. Additionally, the standard does not forbid standard code from producing too much heat and setting your computer on fire, simply because compiler does not have a way to control heat production. –  hyde May 19 '13 at 6:38
    
@hyde: You forgot the <pedantry> tags. :P The point is, C itself places no limits on the resulting behavior. Your computer maker and the CPSC are what keep the fire from happening. –  cHao May 19 '13 at 12:31
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I'm pretty sure you need pointers to function pointers to swap pointers, no? This type of swapping function swaps values; you really want to deal in addresses. The example function call wouldn't really work because C doesn't treat functions as first-class variables so you can't actually swap functions directly; you need to use pointers to function addresses, since addresses CAN be swapped:

void swap2(int(**a)(int), int(**b)(int)) {
   int(*temp)(int) = *a;
   *a = *b;
   *b = *temp;
}

int(*func1)(int) = &foo;
int(*func2)(int) = &bar;

swap2(&func1, &func2);
share|improve this answer
    
Well this works in the scope of the function but doesn't alter the actual function pointer addresses. Print the function pointers before and after and you'll see. –  Miles Alden May 16 '13 at 13:27
    
Like you could call func1() & func2(), which are now swapped, but calling foo() & bar() show them unaffected. –  Miles Alden May 16 '13 at 18:14
    
Function addresses are constant; you can't move code in C without a LOT more effort, under the right conditions, such as the code segment actually being writable, or doing a lot of assembly-level wizardry, and if the stars are aligned you won't crash your computer :D. –  cactus1 May 16 '13 at 20:35
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Your code will give error like "invalid lvalue" at the time of assignment. As I can see in your code you are trying to swap pointers without changing its values so have a look on below solution.

void swap2(int(**a)(int), int(**b)(int)) {   
   int(*temp)(int) = *a;
   *a = *b;
   *b = temp;
}

int main(){
    int(*temp1)(int) = &funcA;
    int(*temp2)(int) = &funcB;
    swap2(&temp1,&temp2);
}
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Yes,you can. Think that a function-pointer is just a memory-address,the single requeriment is: where you will keep such address needs to be mutable. Say,int (*foo)() not really to where foo points to. May be to printf() or fopen().

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Although the subject asks about swapping functions, you actually want to emulate what swizzle does. This just means you want to be able to call the same function name but have it do something different.

A pointer only solution will not give you that behavior. If that is not important to you, then you should adopt one of the function pointer only solutions provided. If it is important to you, then, you will need to introduce a layer of abstraction. The abstraction could use function pointers under the hood (although there are other solutions).

The API to users of this interface would be:

/* API to initialize */
void abstract_func_init ();

/* API to manipulate abstract functions */
typedef int abstract_func_type ();
abstract_func_type * abstract_func_get (abstract_func_type *key);
int abstract_func_set (abstract_func_type *key, abstract_func_type *behavior);

/* the abstract functions */
extern int foo ();
extern int bar ();

The implementation of such an interface could look like:

static void insert (abstract_func_type *key, abstract_func_type **behavior)
{ /* associate key to behavior */ }
static abstract_func_type ** lookup (abstract_func_type *key)
{ /* return behavior from key */ }

abstract_func_type * abstract_func_get (abstract_func_type *k) {
    abstract_func_type **f = lookup(k);
    if (f) return *f;
    return 0;
}

int abstract_func_set (abstract_func_type *k, abstract_func_type *p) {
    abstract_func_type **f = lookup(k);
    if (f) {
        *f = p;
        return 0;
    }
    return -ENOENT;
}

#define DEFINE_ABSTRACT_FUNC(func) \
    static int static_##func (); \
    static abstract_func_type *func##_ptr = static_##func; \
    int func () { return func##_ptr(); } \
    static int static_##func ()

DEFINE_ABSTRACT_FUNC(foo) { return puts("foo"); }
DEFINE_ABSTRACT_FUNC(bar) { return puts("bar"); }

void abstract_func_init () {
    insert(foo, &foo_ptr);
    insert(bar, &bar_ptr);
}

Then, the swap() you initially presented in your post could be implemented like this:

void swap (abstract_func_type *a, abstract_func_type *b) {
    abstract_func_type *ap = abstract_func_get(a);
    abstract_func_type *bp = abstract_func_get(b);
    abstract_func_set(a, bp);
    abstract_func_set(b, ap);
}

Here is a program that calls swap():

    puts("before swap");
    foo();
    bar();
    swap(foo, bar);
    puts("after swap");
    foo();
    bar();

And its output would be:

before swap
foo
bar
after swap
bar
foo

To automate the adding of abstract functions into the lookup table, you could introduce into the build system an extra step that called a script that would grep out the DEFINE_ABSTRACT_FUNC lines, and generate a new source file that had a function with the calls to insert() for each such line.

A complete version of the mock-up can be found here.

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Yay, another non-constructive downvote. As a pre-emptive response, this solution uses an abstraction layer between the API and the delegated action of the API. The swizzle() API is used to swap the delegated actions. It gives the behavior that the poster asked for (calling the same APIs by name now produces different behavior). –  jxh May 17 '13 at 5:48
    
Problem is, it's useless. It requires altering one (or both!) of the endpoints of the call. That defeats every sane reason for wanting to swap names rather than use a function pointer explicitly. –  cHao May 18 '13 at 11:08
1  
@cHao: Since no such feature exists in C++, but the behavior is desired, then the only way to provide the behavior is to introduce an abstraction in code. You can do things like introduce macros to make defining a "swizzle-able" function easier, but how can you introduce a new behavior without writing new code? –  jxh May 18 '13 at 16:31
    
It doesn't seem like you've introduced a desired behavior, though. You've certainly built a cute look-alike, but (1) it's unusable in nearly every case where the desired behavior would actually seem desirable; (2) it's not providing functionality (or even abstraction!) over what a function pointer provides; and (3) it's more work to implement. Where's the benefit to doing it like this, rather than simply pretending a function pointer is a function? –  cHao May 18 '13 at 18:22
1  
Actually this is pretty darned useful, and thanks for writing it. Essentially you've pieced together a chunk of the objc runtime, which uses a similar lookup action which then enables swizzling. –  Miles Alden May 18 '13 at 19:00
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