Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was asked this question in an interview. I replied that it was a conditional construct because

  • it executes once, unlike a loop which has the capability to execute multiple times.
  • There is no loop control mechanisms, there is only conditional switching based on different cases.

So is my answer right or wrong, is there a better answer?

Also he asked me the reason why break; statements work with switch-case since, break; only works with loops. This question I could not answer.

Is there any standards/documentation in C which clarifies this part ? Please do point me in the right direction. Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Of course there is some standards documentation which clarifies this, it's called ISO/IEC 9899:2011, and is the actual standard used for the C programming language (and ISO/IEC 14882:2011 for the C++ programming language). –  Joachim Pileborg May 16 '13 at 6:37
    
@JoachimPileborg Thanks , now i can quote the exact iso standard number , to make my point !! –  CodeCrusader May 16 '13 at 6:40
    
Well you can still find the C11 standards draft quite easily, and both the C and C++ standard documents are quite cheap to buy on ANSI (just bought a copy of the C11 standard yesterday for $30, well worth it IMO). –  Joachim Pileborg May 16 '13 at 6:45
2  
@JoachimPileborg, But evidently good enough to use as a solid reference on SO, which is all I really use it for apart from sometimes looking up something for myself in there to check. –  chris May 16 '13 at 6:54
1  
@CodeCrusader: the break thing is a joke. break can be used wherever the Standard says it can be used, and it can be used in switches. Whether switch is a "conditional" or a "loop" construct does not matter, syntax is just syntax. –  Matthieu M. May 16 '13 at 9:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In C++

switch is selection-statement

n3376 6.4/1 and 6.4.2 is about switch

selection-statement:
...
switch ( condition ) statement

break is jump-statement

n3376 6.6.1/1

The break statement shall occur only in an iteration-statement or a switch statement and causes termination of the smallest enclosing iteration-statement or switch statement; control passes to the statement following the terminated statement, if any.

share|improve this answer
    
So much clear now... –  CodeCrusader May 16 '13 at 6:42
1  
In case you're interested, N3485 is there, too. –  chris May 16 '13 at 6:45
    
@chris thanks, new draft - good thing. –  ForEveR May 16 '13 at 6:46
1  
@ForEveR, Speaking of new, N3690 was just released, and contains C++14 information, but I would really heed the big warning at the top. –  chris May 16 '13 at 6:49

C answer

There is no formal term called "conditional construct". The C standard uses the term selection statement. The C language has three different selection statements: if, if-else and switch (C11 6.8.4). Loops sort under the category of iteration statements (6.8.5).

The break statement is a jump statement, just like goto. It has some restrictions of where it is allowed to appear:

C11 6.8.6.3

A break statement shall appear only in or as a switch body or loop body.


So to answer the interview questions:

Is switch case a loop or a conditional construct?

If you by conditional construct mean a selection statement, then yes, switch is a conditional construct.

why break; statements work with switch-case since, break; only works with loops

No, the question is incorrect, it does not only work with loops. It works with switch and loops. This is because the C language is defined in that way (6.8.6.3).

share|improve this answer

A switch case is a way of wrapping a block of instructions and saying execute (part of) it, beginning here and ending here. The matching case marks the beginning and the following break marks the end.

The block could be a few instructions:

{
     instruction_A;
     instruction_B;
     instruction_C;
     instruction_D;
}

The case statements say where to dynamically start based upon the switch value:

switch(value)
{
case one:
     instruction_A;
     instruction_B;
case two:
     instruction_C;
case three:
     instruction_D;
}

In case one, all the instructions will be called, as there is no break. Case two will execute C and D, if there are no exceptions (c;.

The break statements say where to stop, and mean it's possible to drop through a number of case statements:

switch(value)
{
case one:
     instruction_A;
     instruction_B;
case two:
     instruction_C;
     break;
case three:
     instruction_D;
}

Case one will now execute A, B, and C, but not D.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.