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I'm looking for an elegant, efficient solution to my problem :

I have this webapp with many components;

One main component include many additions that will grow/evolve with time.

This main component has a function in which before actually doing what it is supposed to do, it is triggering an event beforedo so that the addons can listen to.

dostg : function () {
   $doc.trigger('beforedo');

   //do stuff but after event is handled by the addons ?

}

In the addons codes

$doc.on('beforedo',function(e) {
   //do before addon stuff
}

Now those before doing stuff may involve ajax request or anything that would take some processing time.

I could increment a counter on ajax requests and wait it is down to nil, but what I'd like is a solution that would just wait for all handlers to finish their job (and therefore that'd work whatever is being done in those addons handlers).

Is there some miracle solution to do this or I have to forget about event in this situation and go another way (array of function to iterate, addons pushing new function into array) ?

Thanks for your expertise!

-------EDIT FOLLOWING THE BOUNTY

Apologize to @xbonez & @Sergiu Paraschiv , I should have edit the question with the solution I'm using now before offering the bounty (solution I'm not totally satisfied with, hence the bounty).

//app
var $doc = $(document.body); 


//component    
$doc.on({
    wait: function (e) { ++$doc.component.handleinprogress; },

    addonready: function () {
        --$doc.component.handleinprogress;
        if ($doc.component.handleinprogress==0) $doc.trigger('readyfordo');
    },

    readyfordo: function () {
        //do stuff after event has been handled by the addons 
    }        
});

$doc.component = {
    handleinprogress: 0,
    dostg: function () {

        $doc.component.handleinprogress = 0;
        $doc.trigger('beforedo');
    }
};

//in component addon files

$doc.on('beforedo', function (e) {

    $doc.trigger('wait');
    //do addon stuff
    $doc.trigger("addonready");
}

I'm not satisfied with this solution because even if I don't need to do stuff in the addon beforedo I still have to add the handler to trigger addonready (in at least one of the addon -> so either i lose flexibility to add/remove addon from the component without worrying whether readyfordo get triggered, either I have to include the handler in every addon - mostly -75%- for nothing).

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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

To wait for all handlers to finish before executing some code, you should use jQuery's deferred API. You can do something like this:

$.when($.ajax("/page1.php"), $.ajax("/page2.php")).done(function(a1, a2){
  // only executes after both ajax calls have completed
});

Further, jQuery's trigger allows you to pass extra params. Pass in a function which will be the callback function.

Your final code should look something like this:

$doc.trigger('beforedo', function() {
  // anything here only executes after the event has been handled
});


$doc.on('beforedo',function(e, callback) {
   //do before addon stuff
  $.when($.ajax("/page1.php"), $.ajax("/page2.php")).done(function(a1, a2){
      // at this point, all your AJAX calls have completed
      // call the callback function
      callback();
  });
}

If need be, when you call callback() you can even pass in any result you might need to pass as an argument. Accordingly, change the function signature in your .trigger() call too.

Expanding on the comment I left below, you can have a common loader function if you like:

$.when(load("page1"), load("page2")).done(function(){
 // ...
});

function load(file) {
  // return the $.ajax promise
  return $.ajax(file);
}

See:

jQuery deferred
jQuery.when()
jQuery.trigger

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah but then where's the modularity? I think that's his problem, he has multiple addons with separate closures/contexts and does not want the main module to depend on the addons but the other way around. –  Sergiu Paraschiv Sep 14 '13 at 8:44
1  
In my example above, the $.when() doesn't need to have the ajax calls. It can instead be to a common loader function that returns the $.ajax promise making it $.when(load("file1"), load("file2")) –  xbonez Sep 14 '13 at 8:46
    
Yup, that's good. That way he can return any promise, not only $.ajax ones. I still hate using a promise where there's no async calls going on though... –  Sergiu Paraschiv Sep 14 '13 at 8:49
    
will test $doc.trigger('beforedo', function() {... to understand how it works; nb: indeed addons don't necesarily involve loading external data, could be anything (calculations, regex replace, dom access & amend) that need to be complete before main goes on with its job –  mikakun Sep 14 '13 at 9:42
    
please see my edit & apo again for doing things the other way round –  mikakun Sep 14 '13 at 10:46
show 1 more comment

Check out my fiddle here. Your idea of counting finished requests is good, it's just a matter of structuring code. Knowing that you need decoupled "modules/addons" this is the way I'd go:

var $doc = $(document);

function Main() {
    var handlersCount = 0;
    var completedHandlers = 0;

    function afterDostg() {
        console.log('after addon stuff');
    }

    this.dostg = function() {
        $doc.trigger('beforeDo');
    };

    this.addHandler = function() {
        handlersCount++;
    };

    this.handleCompleted = function() {
        completedHandlers++;

        if(completedHandlers === handlersCount) {
            completedHandlers = 0;
            afterDostg();
        }
    }
}

function Addon1(main) {
    main.addHandler();

    $doc.on('beforeDo', function(e) {
        console.log('addon1 stuff');
        main.handleCompleted();
    });
}

function Addon2(main) {
    main.addHandler();

    $doc.on('beforeDo', function(e) {
        setTimeout(
            function() {
                console.log('addon2 stuff');
                main.handleCompleted();
            },
            1000
        );
    });
}

var main = new Main();
var addon1 = new Addon1(main);
var addon2 = new Addon2(main);

main.dostg();

Using this method, addons can have anything in them, they just have to notify "Main" when they finish whatever they need to do.

If I were you I'd go even further and extract the whole "handlers" code in "Main" in a separate class instantiated as a public property in "Main" with afterDostg as a parameter. That way you don't polute app code with meta stuff like this.

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1  
This is not half bad, I would suggest a slight change though: in this case the add-ons need to know about the main. To remove this limitation you could use a beforeDoDone event. You trigger this in the add-ons, when they are done. You add a listener to this event in the main and you decrement the counter in this listener (and you call the callback from this listener of course). What do you think? –  Balint Bako Sep 14 '13 at 9:00
1  
My initial code used that, but then I decided it's a bit too much for a POC. But yes, if you need more decoupling this is the way to go: jsfiddle.net/cVQdX/4 –  Sergiu Paraschiv Sep 14 '13 at 9:16
    
In that case +1 –  Balint Bako Sep 14 '13 at 9:24
    
actually & i apologize for not updating the question before putting the bounty, but I chose to go not long after asking the question(& getting no answer at that time) with something very similar @BalintBako solution; will test all given answers & see which one i prefer (in term of performance -for user & coder -> ie "straightforwardness" & code elegance) –  mikakun Sep 14 '13 at 9:35
    
please see my edit & apo again for doing things the other way round –  mikakun Sep 14 '13 at 10:47
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Softlion pointed out several points, with which I agree.

Potential problems :

One problem may arise with your current implementation, if one of your addons calls $doc.trigger("addonready"); synchronously :

// addon 1 :
$doc.on('beforedo',function(e){

   $doc.trigger('wait');
   //do synchronous stuff :
   $('body').append('<div class="progressbar"></div>');
   console.log('addon 1 initialized');
   $doc.trigger("addonready");
}

// addon 2 :
$doc.on('beforedo',function(e){

   $doc.trigger('wait');
   $.ajax({ ...
     complete: function(){
       console.log('addon 2 initialized');
       $doc.trigger("addonready");
     }
   });
}

In this case, depending on the resolution order of your callbacks, you may accidentally trigger your readyfordo event after the first addon has triggered its addonready function, and before the second one has had a change to trigger wait.

Your code also relies on the asumption that all of your addons will always execute exactly one .trigger('addonready') for each .trigger('wait'). I don't know how your code looks like, or how many addons you have, but ensuring that this is the case for each possible execution path is quite a hurdle (e.g. : have you tested the 2^n failure cases if you have n ajax calls ?)

As long as all your code is in-house, you may have control over it, but it does seem brittle to me.

jQuery's Deferreds / Promises :

A generic pattern is to use jQuery's promises. All of jQuery's asynchronous calls are now wrapped in promises, and the library offers an API which will allow to manipulate those in a rather elegant way - plus it probably has been tested in more corner cases than your own code.

Here are my 2 cents :

$doc.component = {
    initQueue: [], //this array will contain callbacks, each of which
                   //is expected to return a promise
    dostg : function () {
      var queue = $doc.component.initQueue;
      var promises = [];
      var i, fnInit;
      for(i=0; i<queue.length; i++){
          fnInit = queue[i];

          //safeguard, maybe useless :
          if (typeof(fnInit) !== 'function') { continue; }

          var obj = fnInit();
          // we stack together all return values in an array :
          promises.push( obj );
      }

      // wait for all that should be waited for, then trigger your "main" event :
      $.when.apply($, promises).then(function(){  $doc.trigger('readyfordo'); });
      // $.when sorts out between promises and other results, and waits
      // only if some promises are not resolved.
   }
};

//in component addon files

$doc.component.initQueue.push(function(){

    //do addon stuff
    //if waiting for asynch event, return a promise.

    //examples :
    // jQuery ajax functions already return a Deferred :
    return $.ajax({ ... });  // just don't forget the 'return' ...
    return $.get(url, {...}, function(){ ... });

    //or, if you need a custom promise, Softlion's example :
    var deferred = $.Deferred();
    doasyncthing(function() { deferred.resolve(); });
    return deferred.promise();
});

Instead of using your beforedo,wait,addonready events, you have your plugins register a function in an initQueue known by your component - note that you can choose not to register the callback if your addon doesn't need one.

Roughly speaking : in your addons, you replace $doc.on('beforeDo', function(){ ... }) with $doc.component.initQueue.push(function(){ ... }), and if you need to wait for something, you return a promise around this something.

You can then let the $.when() function take care of bundling all together and waiting for what should be waited for.

UPDATE : actually, $.when expects the promises as separate arguments

If stored in an array, you need to call $.when.apply($, array) to fit the function's signature.

$.when(array) will consider that its argument (the array) is not a Promise, and resolve immediately.

fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
i use a settimeout to trigger addonready if stg but not ajax, not really an issue, not so elegant i agree hence why i'm looking for another way. there is something missing in your code, it's the case where the array of function is empty (unless an empty array is considered resolved by when() ??) –  mikakun Sep 17 '13 at 11:41
    
@mikakun: yes, when() will treat non-promises as "resolved", and will also trigger .complete if you give an empty list of parameters. I hadn't tested my code, $.when actually expects separate arguments (not an array). You will need to use $.when.apply($, array) to feed an array (less elegant). –  LeGEC Sep 17 '13 at 13:28
    
bounty to you for nice explanation about the use of when with array of promise & accept to xbonez to teach me the trigger callback that will be of use as well i think –  mikakun Sep 21 '13 at 9:49
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The solution your are using is not working properly. If you have 2 addons, the 1st receive the event and register 'wait', then the same one calls readyfordo. What happens with the 2nd ? It won't have the chance to init.

Each of your addons must add itself in a global array, and when you throw your event you should handle the case when there is nothing in the array, otherwise you use the same code in your solution without using the handleinprogress counter, just use the length of the array instead.

You may also be interested in the promise pattern (see Deferred object in jquery doc) which make waiting asynchronously for an "event" a breeze.

http://api.jquery.com/category/deferred-object/

http://api.jquery.com/deferred.promise/

var plugins = [];

$.someplugin = function() {
    plugins.push(this);

    this.init = function() {
        //do some things synchronously

        //start async things. The callback is called when the async thing is finished.
        var deferred = $.Deferred();
        doasyncthing(function() { deferred.resolve(); });

        //return a promise
        return deferred.promise();
    }
}

Caller:

function throwEventAndWaitAsync(callback) {
    var promises = [];
    for(plugin in plugins) {
        promises.push(plugin.init());
    }

    //Wait on all promises asynchronously then call callback()
    $.when(promises).then(callback);
}

as simple as that.

share|improve this answer
    
no it is working , all addons handle the event not just the first one or the last one (when registered in them obviously) & each trigger a wait handled by the father component incrementing the counter and since there is always at least one addon that is doing something (which allow me to not add a handler to addons that don't need one - if i do add a useless handler -to be sure addonready is triggered at least once- i need a settimeout (1) before triggering the addonready this to make sure all the wait are triggered before an addonready is triggered. –  mikakun Sep 14 '13 at 12:23
    
can you expand on using an array (efficiently & asynchronously)? –  mikakun Sep 14 '13 at 12:24
    
the array just references all plugins objects (they should be objects). Each object has common plugin methods that your "event" can call instead of using DOM events. The init method returns a promise, and in the "event" method you wait asynchronously for all promises to be "done". As simple as that. See my link to deferred/promises. –  Softlion Sep 14 '13 at 16:10
    
ok this could look like the start of an improvement of my code and frankly just enough to accept the answer but frankly not enough for the bounty & my hard earned points (sorry) as it doesn't fit the specs which are : it's not an instantiating event -> most addon have no job to do on this component event (only some have, & sometimes none have) - please for the bounty adapt this idea to my code structure & specs –  mikakun Sep 16 '13 at 7:58
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