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Conventional wisdom has it that when you are ORing bytes together to make an int, you should use the | operator rather than the + operator, otherwise you could have problems with the sign bit.

But this doesn't appear to be the case in C#. It looks like you can happily use the + operator, and it still works even for negative results.

My questions:

  • Is this really true?
  • If so, why does it work? (And why do a lot of people think it shouldn't - including me! ;)

Here's a test program which I believe tests every possible combination of four bytes using the + operator and the | operator, and verifies that both approaches yield the same results.

Here's the test code:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace Demo
{
    class Program
    {
        int Convert1(byte b1, byte b2, byte b3, byte b4)
        {
            return b1 + (b2 << 8) + (b3 << 16) + (b4 << 24);
        }

        int Convert2(byte b1, byte b2, byte b3, byte b4)
        {
            return b1 | (b2 << 8) | (b3 << 16) | (b4 << 24);
        }

        void Run()
        {
            byte b = 0xff;

            Trace.Assert(Convert1(b, b, b, b) == -1); // Sanity check.
            Trace.Assert(Convert2(b, b, b, b) == -1);

            for (int i = 0; i < 256; ++i)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(i);
                byte b1 = (byte) i;

                for (int j = 0; j < 256; ++j)
                {
                    byte b2 = (byte) j;

                    for (int k = 0; k < 256; ++k)
                    {
                        byte b3 = (byte) k;

                        for (int l = 0; l < 256; ++l)
                        {
                            byte b4 = (byte) l;
                            Trace.Assert(Convert1(b1, b2, b3, b4) == Convert2(b1, b2, b3, b4));
                        }
                    }
                }
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Done.");
        }

        static void Main()
        {
            new Program().Run();
        }
    }
}

[EDIT]

To see how this works, consider this:

byte b = 0xff;

int i1 = b;
int i2 = (b << 8);
int i3 = (b << 16);
int i4 = (b << 24);

Console.WriteLine(i1);
Console.WriteLine(i2);
Console.WriteLine(i3);
Console.WriteLine(i4);

int total = i1 + i2 + i3 + i4;

Console.WriteLine(total);

This prints:

255
65280
16711680
-16777216
-1

Aha!

share|improve this question
1  
It works because no bits ever overlap, so there's never a carry. I've never heard of this not working though, isn't that a holdover from C where nothing is ever defined? – harold May 16 '13 at 8:15
    
Well, I asked this question because an answer I made to another question it was edited to use | instead of + in case of sign bit problems. – Matthew Watson May 16 '13 at 8:17
1  
@dlev if the bytes were signed, ORing them wouldn't work either. The upper bits would just be 1 (if any of the bytes were negative). You'd have to AND with 255 after upcasting to int. – harold May 16 '13 at 8:17
    
It's bad style and causes eye cancer for experienced programmers, so don't do it. – starblue May 18 '13 at 7:16
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Differences:

  1. When bits overlap, | and + will produce different results:

    2 | 3 = 3
    2 + 3 = 5
    
  2. When actually using signed bytes, the result will be different:

    -2 | -3   = -1
    -2 + (-3) = -5
    
share|improve this answer
    
OK, of course that makes sense. I was somewhat put off by people "correcting" an answer I made to a question earlier. Seems like the correction was not necessary (but it's a good idea to always use | in any case, because it will always work even if the bits overlap). – Matthew Watson May 16 '13 at 8:25
    
@MatthewWatson: IMO the change to your answer was unnecessary, especially in the given context. – Daniel Hilgarth May 16 '13 at 8:26

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