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see the code below, I define a function in another function,

void test1(void)
{
 void test2(void)
 {
   printf("test2\n");
 }
 printf("test1\n");
}

int main(void)
{
 test1();
 return 0;
}

this usage is odd,is it a usage of c89/c99 or only a extension of gcc (I used gcc 4.6.3 in ubuntu 12 compiled). I run this code and it output "test2" and "test1".test2 can be only called in test1.

What's more,what's the common scene of this usage or what does this usage used for?

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3  
Its limiting the scope of test2() you cannot call it outside test1(). –  bikram990 May 16 '13 at 8:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Yes, this is a GCC extension.

It's not C, it's not portable, and thus not very recommended unless you know that GCC will

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1  
Of course if you have C++11, you can pretty much define nested functions with lambdas. –  chris May 16 '13 at 8:41
    
Is it possible to call only test1 and exclude execution of test2 ? –  bjskishore123 May 16 '13 at 8:43
2  
@bjskishore123, auto test2 = []{printf("test2\n");}; will not execute it, but still act like a function definition for what it's worth. –  chris May 16 '13 at 8:46
    
@unwind if it is a gcc extension,what's the purpose of this usage? –  Ezio May 16 '13 at 9:01
1  
@CTMacUser: Doesn't even need a variable: []{ return printf("test3\n"); }();. But that's getting suspiciously close to Perl. –  MSalters May 16 '13 at 12:33

Nested functions are only allowed in C but are seldomly used because they are visible within that function scope only. However if you want to workaround nested functions you can do something like this

#include<stdio.h>
typedef void (*fptr)(void);
fptr test1(void) {
    void test2(void) {
        printf("test2\n");
    }
printf("test1\n");
return test2;
}
int main(void) {
    void (*f)(void);
    f = test1();
    f();
    return 0;
 }
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As written, it's not legal C++. You can, however, define a class within a function, and define functions in that class. But even then, in pre C++11, it's still only lexical nesting; the class you define does not "capture" any of the context of the outer function (unless you implement the capture explicitly); in a true nested function, the nested function can access local variables in the outer function. In C++11, you can define a lambda function, with automatic capture.

The reason C and C++ never adopted nested functions is because in order to make capture work, you need additional information, with the result that a pointer to function becomes more complex. With the result that either you cannot take the address of the nested function (lack of orthogonality), a pointer to a nested function is incompatible with a normal pointer to a function (which ends up requiring too many external details to perculate out), or all pointers to functions have the extra information (and you pay for something you don't use most of the time).

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The "capture", did you mean "closure"? –  Marcus May 16 '13 at 8:57
2  
@Marcus - "capture" is the intent, "closure" is one implementation. Only the compiler is supposed to care about the closure, and it may choose a different implementation (though closures are normal for good reason). –  Steve314 May 16 '13 at 9:06
1  
@Marcus To extend on Steve314's response, I used "capture" because that is the word used in the C++ standard. And as defined in C++, it is somewhat different than closure, as I know it. In particular, in C++, capture can be implemented by copy or by reference, it only affects specific variables, and it in no way affects the lifetime of those variables. –  James Kanze May 16 '13 at 11:19
1  
@Steve314, C# doesn't have them, but I use lambdas for this purpose -- basically something to replace the language's missing #define macros for testing over a static list of items (ie no runtime iteration). –  Blindy May 16 '13 at 14:18
1  
@Steve314 How could C# or Java have nested functions? In both languages, all functions must be a member of a class. –  James Kanze May 16 '13 at 15:19

http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-3.0.2/gcc_5.html#SEC71

Nested functions explanation.

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