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Is it possible to get a char* for a string variable in C#?

I need to convert a path string to a char* for using some native win32 function ...

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6 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can pass a StringBuilder as a char*

Have a look at http://pinvoke.net to see if the signature for the function is not already there.

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+1, Or just string if it is an input only parameter. –  user7116 Nov 1 '09 at 21:50
3  
I am awarding this answer since you basically answered my question but it seems that, at least for what I was doing all that was needed was fixed(char* s = string){...} –  Kris Nov 2 '09 at 10:08
2  
I tried this with SecureString(char*, int length) and neither SecureString(sb, sb.Length) or SecureString((char*)sb, sb.Length) works. Says cannot convert System.Text.StringBuilder to char*. –  Despertar Jun 8 '12 at 2:24
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Well you could certainly do this:

    string l_pos = "my string";
    unsafe 
    {
        fixed (char* l_pSrc = l_pos)
        {               
              // do some works
        }
    }

where there is an operator (char*) bound to the string object. However, the output format may not be compatible with the underlying C or other format... this is however quite a good solution to parse the string. Hope it's helpful for anybody who reads this post.

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That depends on what you want to do. When you call a Win32 function via PInvoke, you should be able to just pass the String variable; the framework marshals everything for you. If you need something more complicated, have a look at Marshal.StringToHGlobalAnsi and other methods of the Marshal class.

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To combine 2 anwers already given, it depends on the direction you need for your parameter.

If the function just needs an input string, ie const char *, you can use an argument of type System.String (or plain string).

If the function fills a string, ie char * buffer, int bufferSize, you can pass a System.Text.StringBuilder .

In both cases the (auto-)Marshaling will do the necessary conversions for you.

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Thanks already for the insights but I have some additional remarks in the comments of a post below... –  Kris Nov 2 '09 at 1:06
    
Thank you for explaining the difference between a function that just takes a string, and one that builds a string. Everyone just kept touting StringBuilder but that didn't seem right if the function isn't going to modify the string. –  Mark Jul 8 '13 at 6:32
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You can get byte[] array from string using Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes. This is probably convertible to char* using fixed statement in C#. (This pins the allocated memory, not allowing gc to move it - then you can make a pointer to it).

So my answer is yes only if you manage to convert byte* to char*. (in C/C++ this wouldn't be a problem, but I'm not that sure about C#)

PS> I'll post some code later if I find a bookmark to an article on this. I know I have it somewhere..

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You should also consider Encoding.UTF8 as that will preserve all unicode characters. –  asveikau Nov 1 '09 at 21:14
    
Or rather, it's better to use Encoding.Unicode (and PWSTR on the C end) if passing to a native Win32 function... –  asveikau Nov 1 '09 at 21:16
    
You have to check first if those aren't multibyte(and I think that they in fact are), because this complicates it a "little bit".. –  kubal5003 Nov 1 '09 at 21:35
    
Funny that you should mention "fixed". Studying an assembly (using reflector) I found online an that relies on interaction with Win32 entities I saw a method that takes a string argument. The first thing that happens to the string is fixed( char* path = (char*)strargument){...}. The Char* eventually gets assigned to a win32 struct (WINTRUST_FILE_INFO.LPCWSTR parameter). Trying this for myself for educational purposes does not work (compiler says "cannot convert string to char*") I do not understand why is this compiler generated, did the orig. code assign the string directly to the struct? –  Kris Nov 2 '09 at 1:05
    
Did some more research... it appears that it is valid in C# to just do something like: string test = "test"; fixed (char* p = test){..}. The thing that threw me of is that the compiler uglies this up by generating: private static unsafe void Main() { string test = "test"; fixed (char* CS$519$0000 = ((char*) test)) { char* p = CS$519$0000; } } Which made me thing I would need to be able to find ways to convert string to char* Who'd have thought it would be as simple as char* = string; –  Kris Nov 2 '09 at 10:05
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No unsafe context is required for the following code:

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace Guess
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            const string str = "ABC";

            Console.WriteLine(str);
            Console.WriteLine(str.GetHashCode());

            var handle = GCHandle.Alloc(str, GCHandleType.Pinned);

            try
            {
                Marshal.WriteInt16(handle.AddrOfPinnedObject(), 4, 'Z');

                Console.WriteLine(str);
                Console.WriteLine(str.GetHashCode());
            }
            finally
            {
                handle.Free();
            }
        }
    }
}
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