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I have a set of data that looks like that (just way bigger):

2  7
3  9
5  3
2  4
7  3
3  4   
2  2

and I would like to produce a histogram with bars at 2 of height (7+4+2), so 13, at 3 of height 13, 5 at 3 and 7 at 3.

I hope the question is not too dumb, but the tutorials I found did not discuss this problem. Thanks for any help in advance.

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1  
For 2, you're looking at the numbers next to 2. For 3, how do you then get 5 and 7? By looking before 3? There's another 7 and another 3. Even then, what's the rule to decide forward or backward look-up? –  Arun May 16 '13 at 9:12
    
Sorry, I forgot I had to leave a line free. Edited the post above to make it understandable. –  user1797862 May 16 '13 at 9:14
    
So you want to sum column 2 within values of column 1? Also, make a reproducible example that we can cut and paste. –  Spacedman May 16 '13 at 9:14
    
No. The left column contains the data I want to count and the right column the number of appearances that were counted. So the first line means, the number 2 appeared 7 times. But not all occurences have to be in the same line. The 2 for example reappears in lines 4 (4 times) and 7 (2 times) for a total number of 13 times. –  user1797862 May 16 '13 at 9:16
    
YES! You want to sum all the values in column 2 for each value of column 1? So where column 1 is equal to 2, you sum the values 7, 4, and 3. Where column 1 is equal to 7, you sum the value 3 from column 2 only. Where column 2 is equal to six you get zero. –  Spacedman May 16 '13 at 9:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
DF <- read.table(text="2 7
3 9    
5 3    
2 4    
7 3    
3 4    
2 2")

library(ggplot2)
ggplot(DF,aes(x=V1,y=V2)) +stat_summary(fun.y=sum,geom="bar")

enter image description here

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Thanks, that did the trick! –  user1797862 May 16 '13 at 9:57

If you want to get the aggregated sums out of the data and plot them later (the ggplot solution does it all) then, starting from DF:

> aggregate(V2~V1,data=DF,sum)
  V1 V2
1  2 13
2  3 13
3  5  3
4  7  3
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Other answers given here probably already answer your question, but for the sake of completeness, if you do not wish to depend on the ggplot package (I cannot really think of a reason for this, but you might) you could use a combination of aggregate and barplot.

> ADF <- aggregate(DF$V2, by = list(V1=DF$V1), FUN = sum)
> barplot(ADF$x, names.arg=ADF$V1)
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