Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to list all sales, and group the sum by day.

Sales (saleID INT, amount INT, created DATETIME)

Update I am using SQL Server 2005

share|improve this question
4  
You have to specify what database you are using, as the date functions are different in their SQL dialects. –  Guffa Nov 1 '09 at 21:19
    
Look here for more info on grouping by day. sqlserverlearner.com/2012/group-by-day-with-examples –  user1369418 May 2 '12 at 8:33
add comment

7 Answers

if you're using SQL Server,

dateadd(DAY,0, datediff(day,0, created)) will return the day created

for example, if the sale created on '2009-11-02 06:12:55.000', dateadd(DAY,0, datediff(day,0, created)) return '2009-11-02 00:00:00.000'

select sum(amount) as total, dateadd(DAY,0, datediff(day,0, created)) as created
from sales
group by dateadd(DAY,0, datediff(day,0, created))
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Nice, SQL Server specific I'd guess –  Andomar Nov 1 '09 at 21:27
add comment

For SQL Server:

GROUP BY datepart(year,datefield), 
    datepart(month,datefield), 
    datepart(day,datefield)

or faster (from Q8-Coder):

GROUP BY dateadd(DAY,0, datediff(day,0, created))

For MySQL:

GROUP BY year(datefield), month(datefield), day(datefield)

or better (from Jon Bright):

GROUP BY date(datefield)

For Oracle:

GROUP BY to_char(datefield, 'yyyy-mm-dd')

or faster (from IronGoofy):

GROUP BY trunc(created);

For Informix (by Jonathan Leffler):

GROUP BY date_column
GROUP BY EXTEND(datetime_column, YEAR TO DAY)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for listing all the different syntaxes –  CTS_AE Oct 29 '13 at 6:53
add comment

actually this depends on what DBMS you are using but in regular SQL convert(varchar,DateColumn,101) will change the DATETIME format to date (one day)

so:

SELECT 
    sum(amount) 
FROM 
    sales 
GROUP BY 
    convert(varchar,created,101)

the magix number 101 is what date format it is converted to

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Yeah it does, what 101 means is explained here msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187928.aspx –  Andomar Nov 1 '09 at 21:29
add comment

If you're using SQL Server, you could add three calculated fields to your table:

Sales (saleID INT, amount INT, created DATETIME)

ALTER TABLE dbo.Sales
  ADD SaleYear AS YEAR(Created) PERSISTED
ALTER TABLE dbo.Sales
  ADD SaleMonth AS MONTH(Created) PERSISTED
ALTER TABLE dbo.Sales
  ADD SaleDay AS DAY(Created) PERSISTED

and now you could easily group by, order by etc. by day, month or year of the sale:

SELECT SaleDay, SUM(Amount)
FROM dbo.Sales
GROUP BY SaleDay

Those calculated fields will always be kept up to date (when your "Created" date changes), they're part of your table, they can be used just like regular fields, and can even be indexed (if they're "PERSISTED") - great feature that's totally underused, IMHO.

Marc

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This would allow you to create an index on a datepart :) –  Andomar Nov 1 '09 at 21:40
    
Yes indeed! Quite useful if you need to be reporting on day, month, year all the time :-) –  marc_s Nov 1 '09 at 21:54
    
what about DAY(Created) ? –  mrblah Nov 1 '09 at 22:30
    
@mrblah: sure, you can do that - over and over and over again..... –  marc_s Nov 2 '09 at 5:51
add comment

If you're using MySQL:

SELECT
    DATE(created) AS saledate,
    SUM(amount)
FROM
    Sales
GROUP BY
    saledate

If you're using MS SQL 2008:

SELECT
    CAST(created AS date) AS saledate,
    SUM(amount)
FROM
    Sales
GROUP BY
    CAST(created AS date) AS saledate
share|improve this answer
    
I'm afraid these examples will group by microsecond –  Andomar Nov 1 '09 at 21:26
    
Andomar, I just tried the MS SQL one (after a minor tweak to the syntax). It happily groups by date here. I don't have time to go and try MySQL too, but I use it all day in my day job and I'm more or less certain that it's going to group by date too. –  Jon Bright Nov 1 '09 at 21:31
    
@Jon Bright: My comment was before an edit. The current one is still incorrect: the date type is only supported in SQL Server 2008 –  Andomar Nov 1 '09 at 21:33
    
Andomar, since you made me unsure, I've just been and checked the MySQL one too. It works perfectly and groups by date. –  Jon Bright Nov 1 '09 at 21:33
    
@Jon Bright: Well cheers (I didn't downvote or antyhing) –  Andomar Nov 1 '09 at 21:35
show 4 more comments

For oracle you can

group by trunc(created);

as this truncates the created datetime to the previous midnight.

Another option is to

group by to_char(created, 'DD.MM.YYYY');

which achieves the same result, but may be slower as it requires a type conversion.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Interesting trunc() ! –  Andomar Nov 1 '09 at 21:27
    
That's probably quite Oracle-specific, but quite handy. There is also a trunc(..., 'MONTH') to quickly give you the first day of the month etc. –  Thorsten Nov 1 '09 at 21:36
add comment

For PostgreSQL:

GROUP BY to_char(timestampfield, 'yyyy-mm-dd')

or using cast:

GROUP BY timestampfield::date

if you want speed, use the second option and add an index:

CREATE INDEX tablename_timestampfield_date_idx ON  tablename(date(timestampfield));
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.