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Say I have a piece of html with inline javascript like this:

<div id="myDiv">
</div>

<script type="text/javascript">
    var myElement = document.getElementById("myDiv");
    if(!myElement)
        throw "Invalid";
<script>

<div /> ...and so on

So I have a script tag surrounded by div tags and the script operates on a div declared before it.

Is this a browser safe/HTML standard way of doing things?

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1  
Just in case... <div /> is not a valid markup –  Ramunas May 16 '13 at 9:46
    
Inline javascript is not a good practice and must be used only with a good reason I think, but I don't think your code could fail. –  MisterJ May 16 '13 at 9:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is this a browser safe/HTML standard way of doing things?

It's safe, yes. It's even advocated by the Google Closure library engineers.

The more standard approach is to put all of your script together at the very bottom of the page, just before the closing </body> tag, as advocated by the YUI folks.

Putting them in immediately after the elements they act on leads to lots of little script tags strewn throughout your content markup, which isn't really ideal (particularly on large teams where the markup/content team and the scripting team may well be completely separate).

Conversely, putting all the script at the very bottom leads to the potential that briefly, you can have things on your page that the user can click (say), where you intend to handle that click in code, but the user manages to get there before the code hooks up the click event handler. It's a small window of opportunity, but it's there. To handle that, you have a couple of choices to mitigate it:

  1. Progressive enhancment, where the click does something useful even without the script having hooked it, or

  2. A small inline script (not a separate file) at the top of the page hooking the relevant event on document.body (assuming it's a bubbling event), where that small script either queues up the clicks and then distributes them when the main code arrives, or (and this is not so nice) shows a "just a sec, we're still loading" sort of message.

You're quite right to not do what used to be the standard practice of putting your scripts in the head and relying on "ready" style events. There's no need for that whatsoever if you control where your scripts go.

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1  
Good explanation. I didn't know the standard approach was to move away from head. –  Kevin Bowersox May 16 '13 at 9:55
1  
Very detailed answer. Thank you –  Shane May 16 '13 at 9:57
    
@KevinBowersox: Thanks. Yeah, it's been a slow burn, but the sooner we get the content in front of the user, the better their perception of performance is. Downloading scripts and such takes time. (Not a lot of time, but time.) The YUI team were seminal on this, I think, with the mantra: "Styles, content, scripts". Of course, if your thing is a web application, rather than a web page, you're probably better off with some kind of "Loading" window making the user wait until all is ready. :-) –  T.J. Crowder May 16 '13 at 9:57

Typically, if you depend on elements in your document, you'll include all scripts at the bottom of the page (right before </body>). This has the added benefit of not blocking the rendering of the page.

Read more about it here.

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True, in a lot of cases, but it is often more important to segregate pieces of functionality into siloed templates containing markup and the logic which operates on it –  Shane May 16 '13 at 9:51

it's better to insert script in end of document

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True, in a lot of cases, but it is often more important to segregate pieces of functionality into siloed templates containing markup and the logic which operates on it –  Shane May 16 '13 at 9:52

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