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I am new to template programming. I have a vector class that I am attempting to template that contains static members of the same class as the parent:

template<typename T>
class Vector
{
   // vector stuff

   static const Vector c_NullVector;
}

I am attempting to initialize this static member but can only achieve success if I explicitly state the type, e.g.:

const Vector2d<float> Vector2d<float>::c_Zero(0.0);

I would rather not have to initialize each type if possible. Is this even possible?

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I suppose no. How can compiler create an object for every possible typename? –  Pavel Strakhov May 16 '13 at 11:22
1  
your Vectors are different types here. And can you elaborate or reword your question. I didn't understand completely. –  Named May 16 '13 at 11:22
    
Does it really have to be static? –  OMGtechy May 16 '13 at 11:25
    
@Riateche And how does compiler create an object for every possible typename in case of std::vector<T> ? :) –  Spook May 16 '13 at 11:28
    
@Spook If T is specified explicitly, there is no problem. Fortunately the code amount is finite and compiler can create an instance for any specified T. But if you don't want or can't specify each T explicitly, things become complicated. –  Pavel Strakhov May 16 '13 at 11:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You must provide a definition as follows:

template<typename T>
class Vector
{
   // vector stuff

   static const Vector c_NullVector;
}

template <typename T>
const Vector<T> Vector<T>::c_NullVector;

If you can come up with a generic initialisation, you can put it in the definition.

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If you put this in the header and then use it with the same T in two different cpp files, would it cause double definition error? –  Pavel Strakhov May 16 '13 at 11:35
    
@Riateche No, it will not. Static members of class templates must be defined in every translation unit where they're used (where they're implicitly instatiated, to be exact). Cf. C++11, [temp]§6. –  Angew May 16 '13 at 11:37
    
This is the correct answer. Thanks. I don't have enough rep to upvote you, sadly. –  John Ferraris May 16 '13 at 14:51

I doubt, that's possible. What about Vector<MyVeryComplicatedClass>? How would you know how to initialize it?

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